Review: The Atomic9 is an amazing loose-leaf vape under $60 – The Next Web

Cloudious9 is set to launch its innovative, inexpensive Atomic9 dry-herb vaporizer. I’ve had my mellow hands on a review unit for the last month and I’ve been nothing but impressed.

I almost exclusively consume cannabis using a loose-leaf vaporizer. I prefer flower over concentrates or cartridges, but combustion ruins the flavor and (literally) burns through your herb much faster. Unfortunately dry-herb vapes are typically expensive and most of them just copycat each other. The Atomic9 is different.

First off, it doesn’t cost as much as most dry-herb vapes. At $59.99 it’s the least expensive loose-leaf vape I’ve used, but it is not cheap. Right off the bat it reminds me of the Pax 3 – the gold standard for loose-leaf vapes with a price to match.  Like the Pax3, the Atomic9 is a quality device that feels solid and well-designed. I don’t feel like it’s going to break under normal use and it looks great.

But the comparisons between the $200 Pax 3 and the $60 Atomic9 stop once you get past the build quality and pleasant appearance. The Pax can be operated via an app, holds a lot more herb, and can also use liquid concentrate. The Atomic9 has a built in scoop, an on-device temperature indicator, and a patented new oven that heats herb thoroughly without causing the device to get too hot or requiring a giant oven.

The short version is this: the Atomic9 is the perfect vape if you’re a light-use consumer who only imbibes “a bowl or two” a day. The small oven is enough for one person to get about three two-minute sessions per load. I found that around the fourth or fifth session the battery needed recharging. This makes it ideal for short trips, vaping on your break, or using right before bedtime. But if you’re a heavy-use consumer you’re going to want to something with a bigger oven and more battery life.

The Atomic9 is a fantastic vape, however, and if it suits your consumption level it’s definitely worth checking out. Whatever the company’s done with it’s patented new heating technology works, and it works well. I found myself exhaling visible vape clouds at low and medium settings, and even at the highest settings the taste remained full and smooth. In the entire month I used it, not a single flake of herb was burned or singed. And, in my opinion, the effects were as clean and long-lasting as any similar products I’ve tried, including both portable and tabletop dry-herb vapes.

I like how innovative the Atomic9 is. I can just picture a group of engineers standing around looking at a product mock-up all thinking “Yeah, that’s cool. But how can we make it cooler?” Like many vapes, it’s operated with a single push-button that turns it on and off and operates the temperature control. Unlike most vapes, it has a built in scoop that’s operated by a slider along its side. This makes it easy to load – especially if you don’t want to get your fingers sticky.

It also has a display on the side with the temperature settings, whichever one you’ve got selected will light up giving you a quick indication of what temp you’re at. I like having the actual numbers, which translate well from my use of previous devices, so that I can try and regulate how much vapor I can get out of a single load. Rounding out its features are a hinged top/mouthpiece that seems pretty easy to keep clean and a standard USB charging port.

I do have a few qualms about the Atomic9. As I mentioned, it’s not a party gadget. This thing can’t keep up with more than one or two light users. And it’s a bit of a pain to pick flakes of herb out of some of the grooves around the oven. Otherwise, this is the best value in dry-leaf vaporizers I’ve ever seen.

Even as a heavy-use consumer I still want to keep one around as a back-up. It’s the one I toss in my pocket on the way to the beach or for a long walk. I like it that much. The Atomic 9 holds its own against much more expensive products and comes away looking like an innovative champ at just $59.99.

The Atomic9 will be available in “early October” on the Cloudious9 website. Stay tuned for our upcoming review of the Tectonic9 vibrating grinder from Cloudious9.

For more gear, gadget, and hardware news and reviews, follow Plugged on Twitter and Flipboard.

Published September 30, 2019 — 21:56 UTC

Report: One in Four Americans Uses CBD Products Daily or As Needed – CSNews Online

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Cannabidiol (CBD) products have become one of the biggest trends in retail since the 2018 Farm Bill legalized them, with more than a quarter of Americans using them on a daily or as-needed basis, according to Acosta, a full-service sales and marketing agency.

Consumers turn to CBD to both help with various health ailments and improve their general well-being, the agency’s new report, The CBD Effect: A Rapidly Emerging Consumer Trend, found.

„Health ailments without a ‚one-size-fits-all treatment’ are quite common and avoiding chemicals when it comes to health and self-care is important across all age groups. CBD sales and projections show consumers are turning to CBD for help, and demand is growing rapidly,” said Colin Stewart, senior vice president, business intelligence, at Acosta. „Consumer CBD sales are expected to reach $20 billion by 2024 — larger than the current annual sales of candy, gum and mints combined.”

Currently, 28 percent of consumers report using CBD products daily or as needed. Among those who reported daily or as-needed use of CBD include:

  • 56 percent of millennials;
  • 32 percent of Gen X;
  • 15 percent of baby boomers;
  • 48 percent of men; and
  • 49 percent of those with a bachelor’s degree.

Pain, mental health and general wellness are the key reasons cited for usage. Specific health ailments vary from generation to generation, with millennials most commonly listing anxiety (31 percent) and general wellness (30 percent). Members of Generation X and baby boomers most frequently list joint pain (31 and 36 percent, respectively) and muscle pain (23 percent for both).

Although sentiment regarding CBD is generally positive, opinions vary. When asked for their perspective on CBD, 55 percent of consumers stated that CBD oil is/might be a new miracle treatment; 35 percent said they weren’t sure what to think of CBD oil; and 11 percent said CBD oil is just hype.

Non-users who are open to trying CBD cited price (26 percent), lack of studies (18 percent) and distrust in claims (14 percent) as the biggest barriers to usage.

CBD is also popular with pet owners. One in 10 of these consumers reported purchasing CBD products for their pets and of this group, 52 percent made the purchase based on a recommendation from their veterinarian. Top reasons listed for usage were pain (29 percent), anxiety (32 percent) and general wellness (29 percent). Top pet CBD products include treats/chews (48 percent), oil (27 percent), capsules (14 percent) and topical ointment (nine percent).

The CBD Effect: A Rapidly Emerging Consumer Trend is available here.

An Introduction To Old Pal Cannabis In Five Smart Questions – Forbes

Cosmic Collider

It’s Cosmic!

Warren Bobrow: iPhone XR

I first became acquainted with Old Pal at the Hall of Flowers, the bi-yearly event known as the Hall of Flowers. Old Pal owns a very special vehicle, a 1940’s era school bus with a raised roof and part of a floor. It is better known as the Cosmic Collider. All that it needed was the Ken Kesey at the wheel of this Merry Prankster style vehicle screaming at the top of his lungs as his vehicle careened down mountains without brakes, “Further! Further!”

I wanted to get on the bus, immediately and never get off. Reminded me of Lowell George of Little Feat: “Roll another one, just like the other one. You’ve been holding on to it, and I sure would like a hit”.

Summerland

Summerland Bong at Cosmic Collider

Copyright 2019 Carly. Foulkes. All rights reserved.

Rusty Wilenkin (Co-founder & CEO) and Jason Osni (Co-founder & President).

Warren Bobrow=WB: Where are you from? Why cannabis? Did you go to business school? Who is your mentor? Why are they important? 

JO: Originally from New York. The idea of building a successful, self sustaining career with the potential to help people was really appealing to me after graduating law school. Having been immersed in big NYC law, I quickly became cynical of the phenomenon that wealth seems to always be created at the expense of other people and cannabis felt like an interesting opportunity to veer away from that ideology. It was also a chance for me to exercise the left of side of my brain and create beautiful brands. Not to mention, to be part of the cannabis legalization phenomenon is not something that comes across your desk everyday. 

 RW: I’m from New York, and as a long time cannabis user, this plant has always been special to me. I wanted to be a part of the movement, to bring this plant to mainstream America and make it accessible to all. My mentor is my father, he is a self made entrepreneur, and has always been someone I could look to for advice. On a personal and professional level, I often look to him when I need someone to bounce ideas off of. 

Old Pal

Just Passing Through

Copyright 2019 Carly. Foulkes. All rights reserved.

 WB: Tell me about your company? What was your inspiration? (Or who?) What is your Six Month Plan? One Year?

 JO: Philosophically, Old Pal was born out of an idea that when everybody is focused on ‚one’ thing, there is often a massive opportunity to focus on the opposite. Old Pal was created during a time in cannabis when everyone wanted to create the next high end, female leaning brand. It was clear to Rusty (my partner and co-founder) and I that, although developing something high-end was a sexy & fun proposition, the average cannabis consumer is price sensitive. We decided to be the first brand to focus exclusively on the value shelf while still taking some of the artistic elements many of the high end brands were using in order to elevate the experience and create a community that consumers are compelled to be a part of. From a brand perspective, we look to companies like PBR that not only offer a value product but have such a strong understanding of their identity that they have created immense perceived value. In a commoditized market it is not enough to offer value, you need to have an authentic reason for being. Old Pal exists to take a step back from all the technological advances that have developed in the legal cannabis market and remind people „Its just Weed, Man”. Old Pal is cannabis for the people and we work tirelessly to ensure our products are accessible to anyone who has interest in the plant. 

 RW: Jason said it really well, we built this thing to simplify weed and to make it accessible for everyone. We were off-put by the sterile, insular brands, and wanted to make something inherently shareable. 

Old Pal

Old Pal

Copyright 2019 Carly. Foulkes. All rights reserved.

 WB: Do you cook? If so, what is your favorite thing to prepare? Who taught you? What’s your favorite restaurant? Where? 

 JO: I am fortunate enough to have a better half who is an incredible cook. I do my best to help out, however, I have found I am notorious for over cooking everything and have been relegated to being the resident „Netflix Operator” while Lauren works her magic. I am a massive fan of ‚Son of a Gun’ in LA, ‚Rich Table’ in SF, and ‚Emily’ in Brooklyn. Lets keep these spots a secret if possible so the wait times don’t get any worse 😉

RW: I am more of a grill type then a cook, that said I love hanging out and sharing a meal with friends. My mom’s duck sauce chicken drumsticks recipe is my favorite thing to make. Soregashi, a tiny sushi place in Hollywood is my favorite restaurant. 

On the bus

On The Bus

Copyright 2019 Carly. Foulkes. All rights reserved.

 WB: What obstacles stand in your way? How do you propose removing those obstacles? What market do you most want to enter? Why? 

 JO: The interesting thing about Cannabis is that the obstacles change daily. With high risk comes high reward which I believe is the massive draw of so many entrepreneurs. The changes that will occur from a regulatory standpoint are the obvious obstacles that will be interesting to navigate over the upcoming years. The other major obstacle is finding a way to create packaging that does not leave such a massive ecological footprint on our planet. It is very tough for us at Old Pal to feel good about who we are as a company when state child proofing regulations force us to use non-recyclable packaging. We have been putting serious R&D resources behind figuring out this problem. Both Rusty and myself are originally New Yorkers. I think being able to bring our hard work home would be a major milestone for us. We also heard that New York city has one or two people that like to consume cannabis….probably a pretty decent market for Old Pal haha. 

 RW: Echoing Jason’s sentiment here, I’d say our biggest hurdles are the regulatory environment in which we’re forced to live as a brand. While we believe in a regulated marketplace, the constant shifts in local regulations have major business impacts. We’d love nothing more than to see our products sold in our home state. New York is a special place, and as a national brand, we need to be there. 

Old Pal

Old Pal

Copyright 2019 Carly. Foulkes. All rights reserved.

WB: What is your passion? 

JO: Surfing & Traveling. It’s how I ‚turn on, tune in, and drop out’….to quote one of the greats.

 RW: I’m truly passionate about what we do at Old Pal. Cannabis has played a huge part in my life, and I’m excited about the legalization movement. While I enjoy rock climbing and traveling, I spend most of my time focused on the once in a life time opportunity in front of us.

On the bus

On The Bus

Copyright 2019 Carly. Foulkes. All rights reserved.

CBD Oil for Anxiety: Does it Work? – Ganjapreneur

We can all agree that the stigmas surrounding both mental health and cannabinoid treatments are dissipating. According to the National Institute of Health, 46.6 million U.S. adults reported having some type of mental illness in 2017, with the highest prevalence of individuals aged 18-25.

CBD, meanwhile, is the fastest growing industry in the wellness sector by far, and the recent legalization of hemp has only further kickstarted the CBD movement into action. 

This article will address and summarize the current and ongoing research as it relates to CBD, which continues to grow in popularity, and how it may interact with the symptoms of anxiety.

How Does CBD Help with Anxiety?

There is a growing body of research that suggests CBD helps with anxiety. Researchers think this is because CBD acts on receptors in the brain called 5-HT receptors, otherwise known as serotonin receptors. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that is responsible for many biological processes including learning and memory, appetite regulation, and sleep. You have probably heard of serotonin as it relates to depression, as most antidepressants and some anti-anxiety drugs act on neurons responsible for serotonin release.

A study conducted in 2018 by scientists at McGill University found that administering 5 mg/kg of CBD to rats for 7 days decreased anxiety-like behavior. They discovered this by measuring the firing rate of 5-HT neurons in an area of the brain called the dorsal raphe nucleus (measuring the firing rate can tell you how active those neurons are). This brain area provides a majority of serotonin transmission to other regions of the brain like the frontal cortex. Essentially, the study showed that repeated CBD administration seemed to increase the firing rate of these neurons, which led to a decrease in anxiety when these rats were behaviorally tested. This mechanism could explain CBD’s anti-anxiety and anti-depressant-like effects.

Other research focuses on CBD’s action at TRPV1 receptors. TRPV1 are proteins present in certain parts of the brain and peripheral nervous system responsible for regulating stress and pain modulation (it is also known as the capsaicin receptor, which is in charge of spicy sensations!). Scientists found TRPV1 receptors and cannabinoid receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal grey of rats, a region that plays a part in anxiety and panic responses. Because cannabinoid receptor activation in this region is anxiolytic (anxiety-reducing) and TRPV1 activation is anxiogenic (anxiety-inducing), some researchers speculate that anxiety can come about from an imbalance or dysregulation of CB1 and TRPV1 signaling in this area. This speaks to the presence of CBD’s unique dose-response curve, as CBD could potentially activate TRPV1 (thus increasing anxiety) in high doses. 

Mice with their TRPV1 gene knocked out experience lessened anxiety; thus, some scientists predict that the use of both CBD and a drug that would block TRPV1 could be a new line of research for exploring CBD as an anxiety treatment.

The cannabis and hemp industries are expanding each year, despite federal restrictions that continue to hamper researchers in their quest to further explore cannabinoid therapies. Photo credit: Brian Jones

How Much Should I Take?

CBD has a tendency to follow what scientists called an inverted, U-shaped dose-response curve. This means, if you imagine an upside-down U on a graph, CBD is effective for most conditions at those median doses (aside from epilepsy, which requires a higher dose). Researchers in Brazil simulated a public speaking task for human subjects to test this. They dosed humans with an inactive control drug, a benzodiazepine, and a variety of CBD doses (100 mg, 300 mg, and 900 mg). They found that only the 300 mg dose of CBD had anxiolytic effects on the subjects during their public speaking task.

If you are looking to use CBD oil to treat your anxiety, it is important to take into account a multitude of factors:

  • Does the product contain any THC?
  • Are there terpenes present, or is it a CBD isolate?
  • What is your history with drug-taking and are you on any other medications?

Many factors can affect how CBD works or how you may feel after taking it; clean cannabidiol is something pro-cannabis legislators are still trying to regulate, and somethings scientists are continuing to examine. Smoking CBD or consuming it via a tincture provides quicker and a more potent relief compared to taking it orally because it reaches your bloodstream faster. Specialists suggest starting at a low dose when starting to experiment, and slowly increase the dose until you’re comfortable or to match your growing tolerance. 

Possible Side Effects

The most common side effects reported from cannabidiol are fatigue, weight gain, and nausea. Side effects also depend on the factors listed previously, i.e. your typical drug-taking habits, other medications that could interact with the CBD, etc. Everyone’s body and brain tends to process drugs a little bit differently, which is largely why results can vary.

Possible interactions between CBD and other drugs may exist because CBD is metabolized by a class of enzymes in the liver called CYP450 enzymes. These are responsible for breaking down all drugs in the body. However, many other drugs follow this same metabolism pathway, including some anti-epileptic medications, benzodiazepines, and beta-blockers. If both drugs are “competing” for the same receptors, therefore, it will be harder for them to be broken down and can lead to more of the drug in your bloodstream.

Research shows CBD can render CYP450 enzymes inactive, which further informs necessary trepidation when combining drugs.

As with any drug, take precautions before you begin dosing. Studies show CBD is nonaddictive, but that does not mean it can’t bew psychoactive. We will learn more as restrictions continue to be lifted — the 2018 farm bill, which federally legalized industrial hemp, was a start — but, for now, we can only be informed by what we know today. And today’s research shows that CBD can be helpful for anxiety with the correct dose and after considering potential side effects and interactions with other pharmaceuticals.

A Great New Portable Vaporizer and Auto Grinder from Cloudius9 – The Portland Mercury

The Atomic9 vaporizer.

The Cloudious9 company has released two new products since unveiling their Hydrology9, a portable water filtration vaporizer that still reminds me of a lightsaber base. I reviewed it here a while back, and have been interested to see what Cloudious9 would come up with next.

Their first new item is a palm-sized portable flower vaporizer called the Atomic9. It offers an impressive array of features and is remarkably well priced at just $59.99. It’s slightly smaller than a PAX 3, and is housed in attractive and texturally pleasing black anodized aluminum. It’s surprisingly light at 2.6 ounces, but offers up a number of well-designed features, two with patents pending.

The device offers six preset temperature settings, between 356 and and 428 degrees Fahrenheit, allowing the user to select from a light to thick vapor. A single button powers the unit on and off, and permits you to cycle through the heat settings, all visible in a slender LED screen along the edge. When ready to hit, a flashing red light turns green.

I settled on the two lowest settings—356 and and 374 degrees Fahrenheit—and got clean flavors of the dominant terpenes in each flower, along with a focused, clear high. The chamber where the ground-up flower is placed is small: I found about 0.1 to 0.2 grams packed it nicely. Filling the Atomic9 was easier than any portable vape I’ve ever used, thanks to a retractable “shovel” which you extend with a slide button on the side of the unit. It allows the user to fill the chamber while forgoing having to touch the herb, sparing you spills and sticky fingers.

The unit’s heating source uses both convection and conduction heating, but never gave me a slightly burnt taste the way some conduction-only-source handheld vapes have produced. I got an average of 10 sessions per charge, and heat-up time was under 45 seconds. After taking 10 or 12 three- to five-second draws, it was time to refill. It’s a great buy for the price.

The Tectonic9 Auto Dispensing Grinder.

Cloudious9’s other new product is the Tectonic9 Auto Dispensing Grinder, and as far as grinders go, it’s a beast. Its size (3.5 inches wide by 3.5 inches long by 3.72 inches high) and weight (nine ounces) make it a grinder with tactical capabilities.

Like most any grinder, you place flower in the grinding teeth-laden space between the base and top. A few twists back and forth, and the flower is ground up into pieces small enough to fall through the holes in the bottom of the base into the capture chamber below. From there, things start getting fancy AF.

No more grinding flower, then having to unscrew the top to see just how much ground weed you’ve generated. That’s the sort of things animals do—or would do, if they had opposable thumbs, which, thank god, is not the case… yet. Instead, you look through a small, clear window on the side to determine how much is in the chamber. Don’t worry about it being dark, because a button turns on an LED light so you can check your levels.

Because you are a sophisticated stoner, I recognize that “a button that turns on a light” is nice, but hardly qualifies as fancy. That’s fine, my world-weary reader. But what if I told same that button also activated what the website deems a “built-in vibration motor… optimized at the perfect vibrational frequency for even dispensing and fluffy materials.”

The pearl-clutching among you may recoil from this truth: Pressing the button creates the sensation that you have turned on an eager vibrator. That’s fine, and some curious and adventurous sex-positive stoners out there are bound to make that connection on their own. Good for them.

That said, the intended purpose is to vibrate the ground-up flower through a slick sliding dispensing „gate,” which reveals a small hole for the flower to exit out of. That happens with the help of a hidden “flip spout,” which provides the herb a short yet effective pouring spout. Place the spout over a bowl, filling chamber or rolling paper, and the motor gently agitates the flower out in manageable measured doses.

The grinder doesn’t have a final “kief screen,” so any THC dislodged by the motor stays in the chamber and on the ground-up flower. It doesn’t come flying out out, and with some strains, I found the flower would need to be gently dislodged from the spout with a gentle tap on the side. That’s hardly a sizeable drawback when a few extra seconds of patience allows you to fill your consumption device with one hand. The unit recharges with a mini-USB cable.

At nine ounces, this isn’t a pocket-friendly grinder, and it costs $60. But it has features unseen on any other grinder, and the solid build and admirable design simplifies the task of grinding and allocating.

Check out the Tectonic9 and the Atomic 9 at cloudious9.com.

A Great New Portable Vaporizer and Auto Grinder from Cloudius – The Portland Mercury

The Atomic9 vaporizer.

The Cloudious company has released two new products since unveiling their Hydrology9, a portable water filtration vaporizer that still reminds me of a lightsaber base. I reviewed it here a while back, and have been interested to see what Cloudious would come up with next.

Their first new item is a palm-sized portable flower vaporizer called the Atomic9. It offers an impressive array of features and is remarkably well priced at just $59.99. It’s slightly smaller than a PAX 3, and is housed in attractive and texturally pleasing black anodized aluminum. It’s surprisingly light at 2.6 ounces, but offers up a number of well-designed features, two with patents pending.

The device offers six preset temperature settings, between 356 and and 428 degrees Fahrenheit, allowing the user to select from a light to thick vapor. A single button powers the unit on and off, and permits you to cycle through the heat settings, all visible in a slender LED screen along the edge. When ready to hit, a flashing red light turns green.

I settled on the two lowest settings—356 and and 374 degrees Fahrenheit—and got clean flavors of the dominant terpenes in each flower, along with a focused, clear high. The chamber where the ground-up flower is placed is small: I found about 0.1 to 0.2 grams packed it nicely. Filling the Atomic9 was easier than any portable vape I’ve ever used, thanks to a retractable “shovel” which you extend with a slide button on the side of the unit. It allows the user to fill the chamber while forgoing having to touch the herb, sparing you spills and sticky fingers.

The unit’s heating source uses both convection and conduction heating, but never gave me a slightly burnt taste the way some conduction-only-source handheld vapes have produced. I got an average of 10 sessions per charge, and heat-up time was under 45 seconds. After taking 10 or 12 three- to five-second draws, it was time to refill. It’s a great buy for the price.

The Tectonic9 Auto Dispensing Grinder.

Cloudious’ other new product is the Tectonic9 Auto Dispensing Grinder, and as far as grinders go, it’s a beast. Its size (3.5 inches wide by 3.5 inches long by 3.72 inches high) and weight (nine ounces) make it a grinder with tactical capabilities.

Like most any grinder, you place flower in the grinding teeth-laden space between the base and top. A few twists back and forth, and the flower is ground up into pieces small enough to fall through the holes in the bottom of the base into the capture chamber below. From there, things start getting fancy AF.

No more grinding flower, then having to unscrew the top to see just how much ground weed you’ve generated. That’s the sort of things animals do—or would do, if they had opposable thumbs, which, thank god, is not the case… yet. Instead, you look through a small, clear window on the side to determine how much is in the chamber. Don’t worry about it being dark, because a button turns on an LED light so you can check your levels.

Because you are a sophisticated stoner, I recognize that “a button that turns on a light” is nice, but hardly qualifies as fancy. That’s fine, my world-weary reader. But what if I told same that button also activated what the website deems a “built-in vibration motor… optimized at the perfect vibrational frequency for even dispensing and fluffy materials.”

The pearl-clutching among you may recoil from this truth: Pressing the button creates the sensation that you have turned on an eager vibrator. That’s fine, and some curious and adventurous sex-positive stoners out there are bound to make that connection on their own. Good for them.

That said, the intended purpose is to vibrate the ground-up flower through a slick sliding dispensing „gate,” which reveals a small hole for the flower to exit out of. That happens with the help of a hidden “flip spout,” which provides the herb a short yet effective pouring spout. Place the spout over a bowl, filling chamber or rolling paper, and the motor gently agitates the flower out in manageable measured doses.

The grinder doesn’t have a final “kief screen,” so any THC dislodged by the motor stays in the chamber and on the ground-up flower. It doesn’t come flying out out, and with some strains, I found the flower would need to be gently dislodged from the spout with a gentle tap on the side. That’s hardly a sizeable drawback when a few extra seconds of patience allows you to fill your consumption device with one hand. The unit recharges with a mini-USB cable.

At nine ounces, this isn’t a pocket-friendly grinder, and it costs $60. But it has features unseen on any other grinder, and the solid build and admirable design simplifies the task of grinding and allocating.

Check out the Tectonic9 and the Atomic 9 at cloudious.com.

CBD Knowledge: How to read a CBD product label – Lhasa OMS

CBD KNOWLEDGE 

HOW TO READ A CBD PRODUCT LABEL

Reading labels for CBD products can be confusing.  There are currently no standards when it comes to how CBD is referenced on product labels which can make it confusing when comparing different brands.  

CBD may be listed as:

  • Cannabidiol
  • Phytocannabinoids
  • Full-spectrum hemp extract
  • PCR (phytocannabinoid rich)
  • PCR hemp extracts

Just to name a few.  CBD is often confused with hemp extract and are at times used synonymously, but in fact they are different and it’s important to know the difference.  

Hemp extract is an oil derived from the stalks and seeds of the industrial hemp plant containing many cannabinoids or compounds such as cannabidiol (CBD), terpenes, minerals, and more.  In order to get CBD and other compounds from the plant, they must be separated in a process called extraction. 

The manufacturers are not required to add the milligrams of CBD to the labels or to list out the CBD amounts versus the total hemp extract, however, many brands have become transparent with their customers and have added the CBD milligrams to their labels.  

Below are three unique CBD tincture labels from various brands to show the difference between similar product labels and how to determine the amount of CBD per serving.  

In the label example below, this product shows that there is 86mg of hemp extract (hemp oil), and 50mg of phytocannabinoids (CBD) per serving. 

  

In the label example below, this product shows that there is 13mg of hemp oil (hemp extract), and 3mg of cannabidiol (CBD) per serving. 

In the label example below, this product only shows the total amount of CBD in the bottle, 500mg, and this is listed as Full Spectrum Hemp Extract.  Full Spectrum Hemp Extract is made up of hundreds of cannabinoids embedded in the cannabis plant such as terpenes, vitamins and minerals. To figure out the amount of CBD per serving, the suggested use is 0.5 – 1 ML 2x/Day, which equals =

(    500 mg of CBD       /       30 ml     )              x                 0.5 (ml)           = 8.33 (mg)                

          Per Bottle                Total Bottle Size                  Serving Size            Amount of CBD per 0.5ml    

These labels are only just a small sampling of the CBD tinctures sold at Lhasa OMS. If you have any questions regarding the CBD products we carry or their labels please contact us at 1 (800) 722-8775 or [email protected].  

At Lhasa OMS you can easily find the right CBD products for the varying needs of your patients. 

CBD Topicals > https://www.lhasaoms.com/promotions/hemp-extracts-topicals

CBD Tinctures > https://www.lhasaoms.com/promotions/hemp-extracts-tinctures

CBD Controlled Dosing > https://www.lhasaoms.com/promotions/hemp-extracts-capsules-softgels-lozenges

CBD Skin Care > https://www.lhasaoms.com/promotions/hemp-extracts-skin-care

Explore All CBD Hemp Extract Products > https://www.lhasaoms.com/herbal-products/hemp-extracts

CBD: Scientists uncover why CBD offsets one of marijuana’s big downsides – Inverse

CBD has a newfound reputation for helping millennials chill out, for forming the basis for epilepsy drugs, and maybe even more effects that have yet to be discovered, for better or worse. The one thing it can’t claim responsibility for producing marijuana’s high, though it may play an important supporting role in that feeling that’s been overlooked.

Both THC and CBD are naturally occurring chemicals in marijuana. CBD doesn’t have psychoactive properties, which is part why it’s legally mixed into seltzers and sold in Carls Jr. burgers, but THC is the chemical that’s responsible for the characteristic high. But THC has negative side effects, too. Incredibly potent weed, for example has been linked to anxiety, or psychosis, a mental illness which causes people to lose touch with reality.

But going by research published Monday in The Journal of Neuroscience. CBD may offset THC’s more negative side effects, turning a THC-high from an anxious experience, into a relaxed, or euphoric one. Roger Hudson, a Ph.D. candidate and Vanier Scholar, at The University of Western Ontario tells Inverse. that his results show a new way that CBD and THC interact in the brain.

cannabis, CBD, tincture The market for CBD has exploded this year. Now scientists are one step closer to understanding how it affects the brain. 

“It is well established that varieties of cannabis with high levels of THC and low levels of CBD are more likely to cause psychiatric side effects,” Hudson tells Inverse. “Our study identifies for the first time a novel molecular mechanism by which CBD may actually block these THC-related side-effects.”

Hudson’s experiment, conducted on mice, is focused on how CBD and THC both affect cells in the brain’s ventral hippocampus, an area involved with reward-related circuitry. His experiment, dives deep into the way that the cells in that region operate, and focuses on a signaling pathway, which is a series of messages that get passed through a cell.

This pathway is set in motion by a protein called ERK, which is affect by both THC and CBD, going by Hudson’s experiments. When he and his team gave mice a dose of just THC, they found that this ERK gets sent into overdrive, activates a singaling “cascade” in the brain. That cascade, says Hudson, made the rats act sheepish and anxious. The more THC they got, the more they clung to the edges of their cage, unwilling to spend time in the open space in the center.

Hudson adds that increasing ERK activity could be one of the reasons that potent cannabis use has been tied to psychosis before. THC, says Hudson, could “amplify the salience of affective contextual stimuli” or essentially, turns up the volume on emotionally stressful experiences that are already there.

But CBD, on the other hand, could help dampen this effect.

weedTHC and CBD both naturally occur in marijuana. This research suggests that CBD and THC affect the same pathway in the brain, but in different ways. 

When mice received THC and CBD, the mice seemed perfectly happy to spend time front and center in their cages. And when they looked deep into the ERK pathway in their brain cells, they found that they had normal levels of ERK activity. In other words, it helped turn that emotional volume back down to a normal level, and “also prevented many of the anxiety and emotional memory processing disturbances caused by THC,” Hudson adds.

At this point, Hudson believes that they’re the first to show exactly where in the brain THC and CBD perform their unique balancing act. And although though it’s hard to take results from a mouse study and apply them to humans, he hopes it could have implications for helping understand the unqiue interplay for these two popular chemicals. Especially, he adds, for people who use marijuana to treat conditions like chronic pain.

But outside the lab, Hudson’s results show that THC and CBD could help strike a natural balance in the high brains of people everywhere. While THC may be the chemical that gets things going, CBD maybe it what keeps it from spinning out of control.

Significance Statement:

Strains of marijuana with high levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and low levels of cannabidiol (CBD) have been shown to underlie neuropsychiatric risks associated with high potency cannabis use. However, the mechanisms by which CBD mitigates the side effects ofTHC have not been identified. We demonstrate that THC induces cognitive and affective abnormalities resembling neuropsychiatric symptoms directly in the hippocampus, while dysregulating dopamine activity states and amplifying oscillatory frequencies in the ventral tegmental area via modulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. In contrast, CBD co-administration blocked THC-induced ERK phosphorylation, and prevented THC-induced behavioural and neural abnormalities. These findings identify a novel molecular mechanism that may account for how CBD functionally mitigates the neuropsychiatric side-effects of THC

CBD: Scientists uncover why it offsets one of marijuana’s big downsides – Inverse

CBD has a newfound reputation for helping millennials chill out, for forming the basis for epilepsy drugs, and maybe even more effects that have yet to be discovered, for better or worse. The one thing it can’t claim responsibility for is producing marijuana’s high, though it may play an important supporting role in that feeling that’s been overlooked.

Both THC and CBD are naturally occurring chemicals in marijuana. CBD doesn’t have psychoactive properties, which is part why it’s legally mixed into seltzers and sold in Carls Jr. burgers, but THC is the chemical that’s responsible for the characteristic high. But THC has negative side effects, too. Incredibly potent weed, for example has been linked to anxiety, or psychosis, a mental illness which causes people to lose touch with reality.

But going by research published Monday in The Journal of Neuroscience. CBD may offset THC’s more negative side effects, turning a THC-high from an anxious experience, into a relaxed, or euphoric one. Roger Hudson, a Ph.D. candidate and Vanier Scholar, at The University of Western Ontario tells Inverse. that his results show a new way that CBD and THC interact in the brain.

cannabis, CBD, tincture The market for CBD has exploded this year. Now scientists are one step closer to understanding how it affects the brain. 

“It is well established that varieties of cannabis with high levels of THC and low levels of CBD are more likely to cause psychiatric side effects,” Hudson tells Inverse. “Our study identifies for the first time a novel molecular mechanism by which CBD may actually block these THC-related side-effects.”

Hudson’s experiment, conducted on rats, is focused on how CBD and THC both affect cells in the brain’s ventral hippocampus, an area involved with reward-related circuitry. His experiment, dives deep into the way that the cells in that region operate, and focuses on a signaling pathway, which is a series of messages that get passed through a cell.

This pathway is set in motion by a protein called ERK, which is affect by both THC and CBD, going by Hudson’s experiments. When he and his team gave rats a dose of just THC, they found that this ERK gets sent into overdrive, activates a singaling “cascade” in the brain. That cascade, says Hudson, made the rats act sheepish and anxious. The more THC they got, the more they clung to the edges of their cage, unwilling to spend time in the open space in the center.

Hudson adds that increasing ERK activity could be one of the reasons that potent cannabis use has been tied to psychosis before. THC, says Hudson, could “amplify the salience of affective contextual stimuli” or essentially, turns up the volume on emotionally stressful experiences that are already there.

But CBD, on the other hand, could help dampen this effect.

weedTHC and CBD both naturally occur in marijuana. This research suggests that CBD and THC affect the same pathway in the brain, but in different ways. 

When rats received THC and CBD, they seemed perfectly happy to spend time front and center in their cages. And when they looked deep into the ERK pathway in their brain cells, they found that they had normal levels of ERK activity. In other words, it helped turn that emotional volume back down to a normal level, and “also prevented many of the anxiety and emotional memory processing disturbances caused by THC,” Hudson adds.

At this point, Hudson believes that they’re the first to show exactly where in the brain THC and CBD perform their unique balancing act. And although though it’s hard to take results from a rat study and apply them to humans, he hopes it could have implications for helping understand the unqiue interplay for these two popular chemicals. Especially, he adds, for people who use marijuana to treat conditions like chronic pain.

But outside the lab, Hudson’s results show that THC and CBD could help strike a natural balance in the high brains of people everywhere. While THC may be the chemical that gets things going, CBD maybe it what keeps it from spinning out of control.

Significance Statement:

Strains of marijuana with high levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and low levels of cannabidiol (CBD) have been shown to underlie neuropsychiatric risks associated with high potency cannabis use. However, the mechanisms by which CBD mitigates the side effects ofTHC have not been identified. We demonstrate that THC induces cognitive and affective abnormalities resembling neuropsychiatric symptoms directly in the hippocampus, while dysregulating dopamine activity states and amplifying oscillatory frequencies in the ventral tegmental area via modulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. In contrast, CBD co-administration blocked THC-induced ERK phosphorylation, and prevented THC-induced behavioural and neural abnormalities. These findings identify a novel molecular mechanism that may account for how CBD functionally mitigates the neuropsychiatric side-effects of THC

Correction: This study was on rats. An earlier version of this story used mice and rats interchangeably. Inverse regrets the error.