Miesiąc: Marzec 2021

Florida’s THC cap legislation likely dead – WCJB

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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (CAP NEWS/WCJB) – The legislative effort to cap medical marijuana potency at ten percent THC appears to be dead this year.

The Governor has said he’s not endorsing the caps and the Senate committee scheduled to hear the bill has already had its last meeting.

Sponsor Ray Rodrigues said it was never about a dislike of the drug but what science is telling him.

“The things it’s supposed to be helping, the two most common recommendations are pain and PTSD. Studies have been done that show when you get to THC levels greater than ten percent, you don’t make pain better, you make pain worse,” said Senator Rodrigues.

The House version is still moving, so there is a chance the legislation can still be heard, but with the Governor saying he won’t sign it, it would be a waste of lawmakers’ time.

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Cannabis legalization in New York gets one pot ETF much higher than the rest – MarketWatch

Cannabis ETFs are all benefiting from news that pot is now legal in New York State but while some are merely lighting a celebratory spliff, retail investors are helping one ETF break out the bong.

Pot stocks across the board were up Wednesday after New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed legislation immediately legalizing cannabis for recreational use in the Empire State, but AdvisorShares Pure US Cannabis ETF MSOS, +7.86% stood out from the pack surging 8.04% well outpacing similar products like the ETFMG Alternative Harvest ETF MJ, +2.42% and AdvisorShares Pure Cannabis ETF YOLO, +6.10%.

A key force in Wednesday’s action was retail interest in MSOS, reflected in the monster trading volume on the ETF , which was well over its daily average and significantly higher than the sector.

And there were more immediate indicators.

“You can’t trade the Canadian weed stonks,” one user posted on a Reddit r/wallstreetbets. “MSOS is the only play today.”

“[MSOS] looks they’re directly invested in US plant-touching businesses,” explained Matt Karnes, founder of cannabis-centric firm Greenwaves Advisors. “They really have a synthetic return but that still likely still attracts the retail crowd.” 

State legalizations are almost always a boon to the cannabis market, but the lack of federal legalization in the US has been a complicating factor for investors looking to monetize the spreading availability of THC. So-called “plant-touching” companies which either grow or distribute cannabis face massive regulatory hurdles when trying to list on a US exchange.

Some of the most heavily-traded pot stocks, like Aurora Cannabis ACB, +2.87% and Canopy Growth CGC, +0.85% now trade on the NYSE or Nasdaq ,but they were only allowed to do so after going public in their native Canada and then using an acquisition or a special application process that proves they are not operating in the US.

Because of the paucity of big, tradeable pot stocks operating inside the 50 states, the cannabis  market has been extremely volatile and speculative relying a lot on the aforementioned Aurora, Canopy, or fellow Canadian grower Tilray TLRY, +3.13%. For the ETF sector, that situation has created similar-looking baskets of Canadian-based equities that are not immediately impacted by state-by-state legalizations.

That’s not the case with MSOS, which uses total return swaps to gain exposure to US-based, Canadian-traded “plant touching” operations like Massachusetts-based Curaleaf Holdings CURA, +5.71% and New York-based medical dispensary Columbia Care CCHWF, +19.44%.  

Dan Ahrens, MSOS’ founder and CEO appreciated the interest of retail traders but made it clear that days like today are why he built the ETF to give investors access to actual US-based cannabis operators, often referred to as  “multi-state operators” or “MSOs.”

“We’re the only one that’s based on US exposure,” Ahrens said Wednesday as the ink dried on Cuomo’s signature in Albany. “At times, people take notice of that.”

What Types of CBD Products Should I Sell in My C-Store? – Convenience Store Decisions

CBD products are available in many different forms from gummies to topical creams.

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As convenience store retailers look to add cannabidiol (CBD) products to their stores, they’re finding they have a large number of options, which can leave them wondering which type of CBD product is going to appeal to the most customers.

CBD is available in numerous forms today, such as edible gummies, oral tinctures that go under the tongue, oral sprays, lozenges, pills, baked goods, beverages and snacks. There are also CBD vapes including things like dabs and wax concentrates. Plus, there are topicals like lotions and salves to rub on the skin. The list goes on.

According to a CivicScience Survey conducted in November 2020, 44% of customers surveyed who buy CBD products at c-stores reported buying gummies, while 26% selected tinctures/oils and 18% opted for topical creams. But finding the right mix for your store depends on your specific customer base.

Of course, first retailers must ensure that their state allows for the legal sale of CBD products. While CBD is now legal at the federal level, thanks for the 2018 Farm Bill, many states have their own restrictions on the products.

Stocking CBD
When introducing CBD to your convenience stores, gummies can be a great place to start.

Edible gummies offer a tasty and familiar product that is easy to use for customers first venturing into the world of CBD products. People seeking out CBD for its anxiety reducing and stress relief benefits often gravitate toward oral products like gummies or CBD oil.

CBD topicals have also been gaining in popularity. Because they are put directly on the skin, they can be ideal for managing pain relief in a specific area or relaxing tired muscles. But there are also oils that can be rubbed onto the skin that are often specifically marketed for anxiety relief.

To begin, consider adding a few CBD items and equipping store associates with appropriate training so they can talk to customers and explain the benefits of the products. Then, see how customers respond.

Stocking a few different forms of CBD — such as gummies, topicals and CBD oil — can help show that your convenience store is a destination for CBD products. And including products in varying price points can help you capture first time users as well as those that regularly purchase CBD.  You may even find your CBD gummies customers return to try topicals, and those seeking an entry level price point may later splurge on a more expensive variety once they know they like that type of product.

Cannabis expungement bill gets Senate approval – Albuquerque Journal

Sen. Katy Duhigg, D-Albuquerque, discusses a bill to expunge criminal records for minor cannabis possession convictions during a Senate floor session on Wednesday. The bill was approved on a party-line 23-13 vote and now advances to the House. (Eddie Moore/Journal)

SANTA FE — A bill that would wipe certain cannabis-related convictions off New Mexicans’ criminal records moved closer to final approval on Wednesday, with supporters describing it as a critical part of a broader state policy shift toward marijuana.

The Senate voted 23-13 along party lines to pass the bill, Senate Bill 2, with majority Democrats voting in favor and Republicans casting “no” votes.

With Senate approval, the bill moved on to the House, which was expected to vote on it later Wednesday as a special session called by Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham stretched into its second day.

……………………………………………………….

Backers of the expungement proposal said it would help New Mexicans who have faced challenges finding housing and jobs due to past cannabis possession offenses on their record.

“What we’re trying to do here is rectify the mistakes of many years — of decades,” said Sen. Gerald Ortiz y Pino, D-Albuquerque, who said low-income New Mexicans and minorities have faced stiffer consequences than others for pot possession under the state’s criminal justice system.

But critics described the bill as rushed and problematic, while also pointing out it was significantly overhauled Tuesday by a Senate committee.

“This is just a poor bill, that’s why we’re amending it 12 times,” Senate Minority Leader Greg Baca, R-Belen, said during Wednesday’s debate.

Specifically, the bill would order the expungement of criminal records for marijuana-related offenses that would fall under a proposed cannabis legalization law.

It would also authorize the release of New Mexicans jailed for minor cannabis-related offenses, though it was unclear Wednesday exactly how many inmates might eventually be freed.

Sen. Katy Duhigg, D-Albuquerque, said the expungement provision would be automatic under the legislation, meaning individuals would not have to file petitions in order for past cannabis convictions to be removed from public court records.

Instead, the burden for reviewing criminal records for expungement eligibility would fall largely under the Department of Public Safety and the state’s court system.

Meanwhile, criminal convictions for marijuana trafficking or possession of large amounts — more than 2 ounces — would not be subject to expungement since they would remain illegal under the proposed cannabis legalization law.

The expungement provision was initially included in a cannabis legalization bill that passed the House during this year’s 60-day session.

But that bill ultimately fell short in the Senate, in part due to opposition to “social justice” provisions among GOP lawmakers, setting the stage for the special session in which the expungement section was introduced as a stanadlone bill.

Senate President Pro Tem Mimi Stewart, D-Albuquerque, said the new strategy appeared to be paying off so far during the special session that started Tuesday.

“I think in the long run it will be beneficial to getting both bills passed,” Stewart told the Journal.

She also said the special session could stretch into Thursday if additional changes are made to the legalization and expungement bills, as such changes would require a final level of legislative approval.

How You Can Legally Get High on THC Almost Anywhere in the U.S. – Lifehacker


Illustration for article titled How You Can Legally Get High on THC Almost Anywhere in the U.S.

Photo: iAmMrBenjamin (Shutterstock)

This morning, New York finally passed legislation to legalize recreational cannabis, making it the 16th state to do so, and the second largest by population after California. Legally partaking for fun is now an option for around 91 million Americans over the age of 21—but even if you aren’t one of them, you don’t have to let stoner FOMO rule your life. Because there’s actually a 100 percent federally legal way to consume THC—and get high—almost anywhere in the U.S.

I learned this as I learn most everything these days, from a podcast—specifically, from an ad during one of the many film podcasts I listen to when I need to quiet my restless mind. The ad promoted a company selling something called delta-8 THC, which is a modified form of THC—the most famous of the psychoactive chemicals in cannabis, and the one most responsible for making you feel high—derived from hemp.

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How is this stuff legal?

Like the largely non-psychoactive CBD, delta-8 THC is federally legal (or, perhaps more accurately, technically not illegal) because of a loophole in the 2018 Farm Bill that allows for the broad cultivation of hemp and hemp-derived products. According to the non-profit public policy group the The Brookings Institution, the bill “puts no restrictions on the sale, transport, or possession of hemp-derived products, so long as those items are produced in a manner consistent with the law.”

The Farm Bill wasn’t looking to legalize weed, so it features a specific restriction on the levels of THC that can be included in these various hemp-sourced products (from oils to tinctures): .3%, a trace amount too small to get you blitzed or have much of a psychoactive effect at all (though your mileage may vary depending on whether your CBD oil is “full-spectrum,” your personal tolerance levels, or your susceptibility to the placebo effect).

But here’s the tricky part: the Farm Bill specifies hemp products cannot contain more than a .3% “delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration.” And being it is a separate substance—and just one of more than “120 other naturally occurring cannabinoids known to exist in the hemp plant,” according to a policy article by the law firm Harris Bricken—that makes delta-8 THC totally “legal.”

You know, technically. For now, at least—in a 2020 ruling, the Drug Enforcement Agency declared “synthetically derived tetrahydrocannabinols” remain schedule I controlled substances. It’s just that no one has addressed quite yet whether delta-8 THC qualifies as one of those, which means the sale of products containing the stuff currently falls under the jurisdiction of the Food and Drug Administration, just like CBD. But that could change at any point—and in fact, commercial cannabis sellers are actively campaigning to make that happen, concerned about competing with a cheaper product for customers’ dollars.

[Editor’s note: After publication, a reader pointed out that delta-8 THC is actually illegal in Idaho, the only state to pass a law addressing the legal loophole in the 2018 Farm Bill addressed above.]

How delta-8 THC is made

The Farm Bill dictates that in order to be legal, hemp-derived products must be just that; technically you could extract delta-8 THC from cannabis plants that also contain copious amounts of “regular” THC, but that would be illegal.

In its purest form, the process starts with the whole hemp flower, which must be chemically distilled to isolate the delta-8 THC cannabinoid. The resulting distillate can then be further concentrated and made into various products that match the ones consumers might expect if they’ve ever purchased cannabis legally, from edibles to oils. Some delta-8 THC is also made by chemically converting CBD or delta-9 THC using “heat, catalysts, altered pH environments, and/or solvents.”

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Does it work?

Great, delta-8 THC is legal [Editor’s note: Unless you live in Idaho, sigh] and, unlike cannabis products even in states with legal weed, it can be shipped through the mail by companies like the one I heard advertised on that podcast. This much I learned easily enough in my internet sleuthing, but if the fervor over CBD oil is any indication, lots of companies are more than happy to advertise products with bold claims of their effects when they don’t really have to offer proof to back them up. This particular delta-8 THC purveyor was promising all the benefits of consuming regular ol’ reefer—calling it “a more functional substitute for delta-9 THC”—without any of the potential (slightly dubious) negative effects, namely: “addiction, sleep issues, paranoia, anxiety, laziness, etc.” (It’s worth noting that none of these claims are supported by verified research—like CBD, the delta-8 THC market is not yet federally regulated, so you have to take the manufacturer’s word for it when it comes to what’s in the products, how they are made, and what effects they might have.)

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My initial reaction was that I’d only believe that when I experienced it, but I wanted a second opinion, so I turned to Reddit as the go-to place to learn everything I could want to know about getting high. (There are subreddits for nearly every state with legal weed, discussing locally available strains and retailers, and offering tips for beginners.) And Reddit had a lot to say about delta-8 THC, most of it exactly what you’d want to hear if you’re bothering to research the stuff. In short: Yeah, it’ll get you high.

What “high” looks like is going to differ from person to person—but then, that’s always the case with any psychoactive substance, from bud to a Budweiser. But the consensus on delta-8 THC, both from the company selling it and from the Redditor’s comments, seems to be that it definitely has strong effects, if different from those of delta-9 THC. Specifically, it is more of a “body high,” one characterized as being “lighter” and “more calming”; it will give you a nice “buzz” while still leaving you clear-headed enough to go about your daily business. Though if your daily business includes being drug-tested, tread carefully—delta-8 THC may very well still trigger a positive result on a drug screening.

That all sounded good to me, so I decided it was worth risking an order—an easier decision, given that delta-8 THC products are a heck of a lot cheaper than the legal cannabis on sale in other states. I chose a 16-pack of gummies for about $30, but you can also order vapes and tinctures, as well as concentrates (if you prefer to make your own edibles). They arrived in short order, and I admit it felt slightly weird opening up a decidedly illicit-seeming product I’d received by regular mail, though I’ve felt the same about weed imagery-bedecked orders of CBD oil in the past. But what I really cared about was whether they gummies would actually work as advertised.

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I ate two, because I am not inexperienced with partaking of legal cannabis and the consensus on Reddit seemed to be that delta-8 THC is about half as potent/effective. Within 45 minutes, I knew I’d gotten my money’s worth. As promised, I felt some familiar weed-adjacent effects—lightness in the body, heightened focus, increased appetite, increased hilarity of Spongebob Squarepants—if with less intensity and none of the confusion or brain fog that can result from getting hit with a heavy lid, so to speak.

Is delta-8 THC going to replace the other stuff as your substance of choice? If you have access to both in your state and your primary goal is getting stoned, buddy, probably not. If you are looking for an intoxicant with subtler effects, though, you might actually prefer it—and, like I said, it’s cheaper, too. And if you live in a state where cannabis is either still illegal or not yet commercially available? It could be just what you’ve been searching for.

This article was edited after publication to include an additional note and link about delta-8 THC’s potential to trigger a positive drug test. It was edited again on April 1 to expand the second on how delta-8 THC is made and to note that delta-8 THC is illegal in Idaho. We also added the word “Almost” to the headline and first paragraph.

How You Can Legally Get High on THC Anywhere in the U.S. – Lifehacker


Illustration for article titled How You Can Legally Get High on THC Anywhere in the U.S.

Photo: iAmMrBenjamin (Shutterstock)

This morning, New York finally passed legislation to legalize recreational cannabis, making it the 16th state to do so, and the second largest by population after California. Legally partaking for fun is now an option for around 91 million Americans over the age of 21—but even if you aren’t one of them, you don’t have to let stoner FOMO rule your life. Because there’s actually a 100 percent federally legal way to consume THC—and get high—no matter where you live.

I learned this as I learn most everything these days, from a podcast—specifically, from an ad during one of the many film podcasts I listen to when I need to quiet my restless mind. The ad promoted a company selling something called delta-8 THC, which is a modified form of THC—the most famous of the psychoactive chemicals in cannabis, and the one most responsible for making you feel high—derived from hemp.

Advertisement

How is this stuff legal?

Like the largely non-psychoactive CBD, delta-8 THC is federally legal (or, perhaps more accurately, technically not illegal) because of a loophole in the 2018 Farm Bill that allows for the broad cultivation of hemp and hemp-derived products. According to the non-profit public policy group the The Brookings Institution, the bill “puts no restrictions on the sale, transport, or possession of hemp-derived products, so long as those items are produced in a manner consistent with the law.”

The Farm Bill wasn’t looking to legalize weed, so it features a specific restriction on the levels of THC that can be included in these various hemp-sourced products (from oils to tinctures): .3%, a trace amount too small to get you blitzed or have much of a psychoactive effect at all (though your mileage may vary depending on whether your CBD oil is “full-spectrum,” your personal tolerance levels, or your susceptibility to the placebo effect).

But here’s the tricky part: the Farm Bill specifies hemp products cannot contain more than a .3% “delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration.” And being it is a separate substance—and just one of more than “120 other naturally occurring cannabinoids known to exist in the hemp plant,” according to a policy article by the law firm Harris Bricken—that makes delta-8 THC totally “legal.”

You know, technically. For now, at least—in a 2020 ruling, the Drug Enforcement Agency declared “synthetically derived tetrahydrocannabinols” remain schedule I controlled substances. It’s just that no one has addressed quite yet whether delta-8 THC qualifies as one of those, which means the sale of products containing the stuff currently falls under the jurisdiction of the Food and Drug Administration, just like CBD. But that could change at any point—and in fact, commercial cannabis sellers are actively campaigning to make that happen, concerned about competing with a cheaper product for customers’ dollars.

How delta-8 THC is made

The Farm Bill dictates that in order to be legal, hemp-derived products must be just that; technically you could extract delta-8 THC from cannabis plants that also contain copious amounts of “regular” THC, but that would be illegal.

The process starts with the whole hemp flower, which must be chemically distilled to isolate the delta-8 THC cannabinoid. The resulting distillate can then be further concentrated and made into various products that match the ones consumers might expect if they’ve ever purchased cannabis legally, from edibles to oils.

Advertisement

Does it work?

Great, delta-8 THC is legal and, unlike cannabis products even in states with legal weed, it can be shipped through the mail by companies like the one I heard advertised on that podcast. This much I learned easily enough in my internet sleuthing, but if the fervor over CBD oil is any indication, lots of companies are more than happy to advertise products with bold claims of their effects when they don’t really have to back them up. This particular delta-8 THC purveyor was promising all the benefits of consuming regular ol’ reefer—calling it “a more functional substitute for Delta-9 THC”—without any of the potential (slightly dubious) negative effects, namely: “addiction, sleep issues, paranoia, anxiety, laziness, etc.” 

Advertisement

My initial reaction was that I’d only believe that when I experienced it, but I wanted a second opinion, so I turned to Reddit as the go-to place to learn everything I could want to know about getting high. There are subreddits for nearly every state with legal weed, discussing locally available strains and retailers, and offering tips for beginners. And Reddit had a lot to say about delta-8 THC, most of it exactly what you’d want to hear if you’re bothering to research the stuff. In short: Yeah, it’ll get you high.

What “high” looks like is going to differ from person to person—but then, that’s always the case with any psychoactive substance, from bud to a Budweiser. But the consensus on delta-8 THC, both from the company selling it and from the Redditor’s comments, seems to be that it definitely has strong effects, if different from those of Delta-9 THC. Specifically, it is “lighter” and has a “more calming high” and will give you a nice “buzz” while still leaving you clear-headed enough to go about your daily business.

That all sounded good to me, so I decided it was worth risking an order—an easier decision, given that delta-8 THC products are a heck of a lot cheaper than the legal cannabis on sale in other states. I chose a 16-pack of gummies for about $30, but you can also order vapes and tinctures, as well as concentrates (if you prefer to make your own edibles). They arrived in short order, and I admit it felt slightly weird opening up a decidedly illicit-seeming product I’d received by regular mail, though I’ve felt the same about the weed imagery-bedecked orders of CBD oil we’ve received in the past. But what I really cared about was whether they actually worked as advertised.

Advertisement

I ate two, because I am not inexperienced with partaking of legal cannabis and the consensus on Reddit seemed to be that delta-8 THC is about half as effective. Within 45 minutes, I knew I’d gotten my money’s worth. As promised, I felt some familiar weed-adjacent effects—lightness in the body, heightened focus, increased appetite, increased hilarity of Spongebob Squarepants—if with less intensity and none of the confusion or brain fog that can result from getting hit with a heavy lid, so to speak.

Is delta-8 THC going to replace the other stuff as your substance of choice? If you have access to both in your state and your primary goal is getting stoned, buddy, probably not. If you are looking for an intoxicant with more subtle effects, though, you might actually prefer it—and, like I said, it’s cheaper, too. And if you live in a state where cannabis is either still illegal or not yet commercially available? It could be just what you’ve been searching for.

Bella Thorne Talks Cannabis: ‘Forbidden Flowers Is My Baby’ – Forbes


Bella Thorne’s cannabis line Forbidden Flowers defies all industry expectation.

Ethereal and unapologetically feminine in its aesthetic, the line consists sun-grown cannabis cultivated in Santa Barbara through a partnership with the Glass House Group. Launched in October of 2019, Forbidden Flowers product offerings include eighth jars in sleek glass ombre packaging, as well as colorful prerolled joints.

The Forbidden Flowers lineup of indica, sativa, and hybrid strains is constantly evolving. The new year prompted a release of three new strains—Moonbloom, Bright Eye, and Passion Project—to the adult-use marketplace. Thorne personally handpicks the strains after a year of R&D. She has even teased a forthcoming hemp and CBD product lineup for the brand’s future that would someday be available nationwide.

I spoke with Thorne on her passion for Forbidden Flowers, expanding its retail footprint across the state, her meticulous joint rolling process while testing new strains, and a potential collaboration with Uncle Snoop someday in the future. 

I love your brand Forbidden Flowers, it is altar-worthy packaging. How did you land on a soft, sparkly, glittery aesthetic? 

I wanted the brand to be an embodiment of my free spirit and personality. That is why you see the fun, soft, glitter aesthetic. I feel like this type of flirty aesthetic is something you don’t see a lot in the industry, and I believe it’s what makes Forbidden Flowers stand out compared to other cannabis brands. 

MORE FOR YOU

What do you want the brand to tell consumers when they see it on the shelf?

I want the brand to tell the consumers that they are welcomed with open arms and to see Forbidden Flowers as something they can enjoy and incorporate throughout their daily lives. I want them to know that the brand is truly raw and authentic. There is no messing around with this stuff, and I want consumers to know the work and love that is put into this cannabis line. 

MORE FROM FORBESSeth Rogen’s Cannabis Brand Houseplant Is Coming To America

How do you feel cannabis can take women CEOs, women in the boardroom, to a new level? Why do women love cannabis?

I think women love cannabis because it can soothe stress and channels a cascade of creativity. The cannabis industry is a particularly woman-friendly environment and actually has a higher percentage of working women than many other industries which I think is so important.

Snoop called you his „niece” on Instagram and I have to know: how did your friendship start? Is he a role model in cannabis, music, or how do you personally look up to uncle Snoop?

Snoop is like family and a role model because we both support each other’s passions. Our friendship started when our good friend Dave O introduced us, he said “Snoop you’re going to love this girl.” The rest is history. He’s become such a strong influence in my life and he always has my back. He is like my cousin, bestie, and godfather all rolled up into one. We obviously also bonded over our love for cannabis and when Snoop smokes my hand rolled spliffs… it makes my heart smile.

We hang out with each other quite often. Snoop has always given me the most authentic advice to being myself. He tells me I am one of the only ones that can keep up with him when it comes to smoking. That goes down as one of the best compliments that I have ever received!  

Is there a Bella and Snoop TV show on the way? 

Probably somewhere in the future. We want to work on some music together and I am sure our relationship will expand in so many other aspects of our lives. 

Let’s talk about weed. I want to know, how much research, testing, and if you had a rough estimate, how many joints/bowls did you smoke to find your favorite strains in the new lineup?

I handpicked each strain, so I had to smoke a lot of joints to ensure that the final selections were perfect. I spent the better part of a year sampling innumerable strains and refining my handpicked favorites. Forbidden Flowers is my baby, and I wanted to make sure that it was nothing but high quality. I will only deliver the best; if it’s something I wouldn’t smoke regularly, it would not be on the shelves. 

Do you have a personal favorite method of consumption?

I only like smoking joints that I roll myself. I can’t smoke from a joint that someone else has rolled. I don’t know why, it’s kind of a weird thing, might be a little bit of superstition. I am so specific and neurotic when it comes to weed. But, it would be nice to get over it so I can smoke from other stuff! 

Have you been in the grow, do you like to grow cannabis or plants? And how do you feel communing with the Forbidden Flowers plants?

I am very passionate about growing cannabis. Forbidden Flowers is grown at Glass House Farms in Santa Barbara so I obviously don’t personally grow it myself but I enjoy being involved and learning more about it. When you’re standing in the middle of all those beautiful, healthy plants, it gives you such a sense of tranquility and happiness. Personally, I love the way Forbidden Flowers is grown because it is some of the highest quality sun-grown cannabis that I think money can buy.

MORE FROM FORBESClubhouse Is A Networking Haven For The Cannabis Industry

I know it’s like asking to choose between your children, but do you have a personal favorite Forbidden Flowers strain? What’s your go-to at this moment?

This is a tough one! Right now I do not have a favorite. Honestly, all of the strains are amazing, you can’t go wrong with any. But I know people will want to hear about one, so I guess you could say my favorite is Moonbloom, one of our Indicas. It has a slightly sweet aroma which I love and hope consumers love too.

Where do you see the cannabis industry in 5 years?

I see the cannabis industry taking off as it gets legalized in more states, and hopefully eventually, a nationwide legalization. There is absolutely going to be more production and distribution in the market. I also expect to see more women leaders getting involved in the cannabis industry alongside other women at the forefront of legalization, cannabis rights, and other related issues. For Forbidden Flowers specifically, we are actually in the middle of expanding our retail footprint. By mid-April you should be able to find us at a lot more locations. So 5 years from now… the sky’s the limit!

Little Shop of oHHo Brings CBD Wellness to Bedford and Makes it Chic – Gotham Magazine

Little Shop of oHHo in Bedford, NYC

This little shop could be the next big thing in CBD.

About a year ago, married couple Nicola and James Stephenson got with their friend Tim McDonald to create a more accessible brand of CBD products. That dream came to life in oHHo, a sustainably-produced line of oils and other goodies to help everyday people have better everydays. Now, that dream steps into New York City with a charming brick and mortar in the Bedford neighborhood, the Little Shop of oHHo.

See also: 6 CBD Products to Relieve Your Anxiety in 2021

Everything about oHHo, from the name to the new shop’s cottage-core aesthetic, is meant to welcome the world, from CBD enthusiasts to curious newbees.

“We just wanted something approachable and friendly and, you know, it’s also a palindrome,” Nicola said.

CBD and THC are indeed harvested from the same plant, but while THC is the compound that gives marijuana its psychoactive properties, CBD contains no THC and so offers users all the physical benefits without the mental side effects.

Everyone has the cannabinoid system, and [it] really puts your body into balance,” Nicola says. “If there are parts of your body that were inflamed or in pain, if you’re suffering from anxiety, or you can’t sleep, this endocannabinoid system is potentially out of balance. Cannabinoids basically nourish your endocannabinoid system. Say I suffer from anxiety, I can take CBD and it will really support my system to do what I need it to do on a cellular level.”

oHHo Nicola and James Stephenson

oHHo’s Nicola and James Stephenson

Upon its launch, oHHo sold CBD oils made of products from farms in New York and Colorado, but has now expanded to include Vermont and Oregon in the mix. The ingredients are grown at small farms to stay true to the company’s sustainable mission.

“We [work] with small independent growers, helping them sustain and farm sustainably in order to produce beautiful bonds that we can make amazing CBD with,” Nicola says. “We’re a member of 1% for the Planet, so we donate a percentage of our revenue every year to that cause as well.”

Their oils were wonderfully successful, but Nicola soon heard from customers that were using the product as moisturizers. This sparked a conversation among the oHHo family around topical beauty products.

At first, they were hesitant to delve into the CBD-beauty world, but the Stephensons decided to listen to their clientele. Hydrating lip and body balms were developed, and those started flying off the digital shelves, too.

oHHo cbd oil 15 ml bottle New York flavor

Next, oHHo dove into edibles, working with chef Nicole del Pino to develop CBDots, oHHo’s take on the perfect gummies.

“We have apple and rose, pear and fennel, blackberry and earl gray,” Nicola says. “They have just been a runaway success. People can take them as they feel. They’re very approachable.”

The company also sells pre-rolls and CBD flower, alongside other products. With all these offerings, Nicola and the team hope to reach as broad a range of customers as possible.

“I feel like Millennials and GenZ really understand me,” she says, „but the older crowd—my generation, Gen X—people who got really stoned at college and had a bad experience, [they] really struggle to wrap their heads around this new world whereby they can participate in hemp and it’s legal, so that they don’t have to have a weight and feel terrible.”

Little Shop of oHHo in NYC

Thankfully, oHHo’s customers are as passionate about the brand as oHHo is about CBD. Nicola says word-of-mouth was oHHo’s biggest form of marketing, which was huge for the company which launched mid-pandemic. For their next wild pandemic trick, the company took the giant leap of opening the Bedford physical location.

“It started as a little pop-up,” Nicola says. „At the end of the day, people still really—myself included—love retail. They love experiences and they have questions.”

Nicola says Bedford community has “embraced” the Stephensons’ shop and blown their expectations out of the water.

“We’ve created a very fun environment where you can learn about plants, you can buy books, you can buy teas, you can buy CBD,” Nicola says. “The most important thing is I get to speak to people about what they need and what they’re worried about.”

Nicola also hinted at a few exciting prospects to come this summer for oHHo: a dip into sunscreen and the New York City market.

“I’m working on new products all the time,” she says. “We’re constantly collaborating, and we’re going to try and keep it interesting.”

Net time you’re in Bedford, visit the Little Shop of oHHo at 13 Court Rd., although you can always learn more about oHHo, their products and their sustainability practices from anywhere in the world by visiting oHHo online.


Photography by: Jane Beiles

PAX Labs Introduces New Era Life Compact Cannabis Vaporizer – Benzinga

Famed vape devices maker PAX Labs announced Tuesday the launch of its newest product: the PAX Era Life. Created for on-the-go consumption, Era Life delivers an effortless experience without compromising on full flavor, vapor or consistency.

Available in four new colors (onyx, grass, blaze and indigo), the Era Life brings together a high-performing battery with PAX’s most compact device yet. The new device works with any PAX Era pod, and features curated, high-purity cannabis, produced by one of PAX’s partners across the country. 

“We designed the Era Life to provide a simple, fun way to enjoy cannabis while still carrying the PAX promise of iconic design and enduring quality that our customers have come to know and trust,” Colt Stander, head of product at PAX Labs, told Benzinga. “Cannabis is one of today’s fastest-growing industries and we’re seeing new consumers enter the space rapidly.

“We’ve taken the best PAX has to offer, perfected the core functionality, and packaged it up in our most portable design yet—perfect for those who want the easiest possible experience but still care about durability, aesthetics, and safety in the products they use,” he said.

Related: We Tested Some Of The Best-Selling Cannabis Gear To See If They’re Worth The Hype