Get To Know The STORZ & BICKEL Mighty+ Experience – Herb.co

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Iowa lawmakers consider legalizing medical marijuana bud – Axios

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Missouri launch of recreational cannabis sales could be turning point for other red states – Marijuana Business Daily

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OK cannabis vote next month would generate millions in revenue (Newsletter: February 3, 2023) – Marijuana Moment

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Minnesota’s unique THC beverage industry threatened by marijuana legalization bill – Star Tribune

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Recreational marijuana may be available for purchase as early as Friday – News-Leader

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Minnesota Marijuana Legalization Bill Clears Sixth House Committee, Senate Panel Vote Delayed – Marijuana Moment

A bill to legalize marijuana in Minnesota cleared its sixth House committee on Thursday. A Senate panel hearing on a companion version was also scheduled, but it’s been postponed.

The House Agriculture Finance and Policy Committee approved the legislation from Rep. Zack Stephenson (D) in a voice vote. The bill is now nearly halfway through its expected committee stops in the chamber.

“Minnesotans are ready for this. Our current laws regarding cannabis are doing more harm than good,” Stephenson said in opening remarks to the panel. “Minnesotans deserve the freedom and respect to make their own decisions about cannabis use.”

“We’ll take a very comprehensive approach to cannabis legalization regulation in Minnesota, with the aim of supplanting a currently unregulated illicit marketplace with a safe legal marketplace,” he said.

On the Senate side, the measure is being sponsored by Sen. Lindsey Port (D). It passed through the fourth of 18 committees on Monday. A planned hearing in the State and Local Government and Veterans Committee for Thursday is being pushed back.

With majorities in both the House and Senate and control over the governorship this session, Democratic-Farmer-Labor party officials are confident that legalization will be enacted in short order following the extensive committee consideration.

This latest development comes about a week after the governor released his biennial budget request, which included proposed funding to implement marijuana legalization and expungements, and made projections about the millions of dollars in cannabis tax revenue that his office estimates the state will earn after the reform is enacted.

The legislation, meanwhile, is an iteration of the 2021 House-passed bill from former Majority Leader Ryan Winkler (D), who now serves as campaign chairman of the advocacy coalition MN is Ready. That group announced last month that it would be lobbying for the measure while leading a grassroots effort to build support for reform.

Gov. Tim Walz (D) has called on supporters to join lawmakers and the administration in their push legalize marijuana this session, and he circulated an email blast this month that encourages people to sign a petition backing the reform.


Marijuana Moment is tracking hundreds of cannabis, psychedelics and drug policy bills in state legislatures and Congress this year. Patreon supporters pledging at least $25/month get access to our interactive maps, charts and hearing calendar so they don’t miss any developments.


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Much of the revised bills that are advancing through committee are consistent with Winkler’s legislation, though there are a few key changes, in addition to the newly adopted amendments. For example, it adds a new license category for businesses that sell “lower-potency edible products” under Minnesota’s unique THC law that the governor signed last year.

There would also be reduced regulatory requirements for those licensees, and they’d be able to permit on-site consumption if they have a liquor license, which is meant to ensure that shops currently selling low-THC beverages and edibles don’t face disruption.

At Thursday’s hearing, members approved an amendment to require regulators to “utilize the expertise of an employee of the office who is experienced in agricultural business development” when awarding loan financing grants to farmers under the new CanGrow program.

The committee also defeated amendments to limit people to possessing one pound of marijuana at home rather than five pounds and to require cannabis cultivators to include information on energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions in mandatory plans they must prepare.

Another proposal that was rejected would have made it so cannabis regulators would need to get approval from the commissioner of agriculture when setting plant propagation standards, agricultural best practices and edible cannabinoid product handler endorsements—rather than merely consulting with the official.

The next stop for the legislation is the House Workforce Development Committee on Wednesday.

Here are the main components of the revised marijuana legalization bills, HF 100 and SF 73:

Adults 21 and older could purchase up to two ounces of cannabis and cultivate up to eight plants, four of which could be mature.

They could possess up to two ounces in a public place and up to five pounds in a private dwelling.

Gifting up to two ounces of marijuana without remuneration between adults would be permitted.

It would promote social equity, in part by ensuring that diverse licensing by scoring equity applicants higher.

Prior marijuana records would also be automatically expunged. The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension would be responsible for identifying people who are eligible for relief and process the expungements.

In addition to creating a system of licensed cannabis businesses, municipalities and counties could own and operate government dispensaries.

On-site consumption permits could be approved for events, and cannabis delivery services would be permitted under the bill.

Unlike in many legal states, local municipalities would be banned from prohibiting marijuana businesses from operating in their areas, though they could set “reasonable” regulations on the time of operation and location of those businesses.

Retail cannabis sales would be taxed at eight percent. Part of that revenue would fund substance misuse treatment programs, as well as grants to support farmers.

A new Office of Cannabis Management would be established, and it would be responsible for regulating the market and issuing cannabis business licenses. There would be a designated Division of Social Equity.

People living in low-income neighborhoods and military veterans who lost honorable status due to a cannabis-related offense would be considered social equity applicants eligible for priority licensing.

The legislation as revised fixes an issue in current statute that prohibits liquor stores from selling THC products.

It also contains language banning synthetic cannabinoids, which is consistent with Board of Pharmacy rules put into place last year.

Here are the other House panels that have passed the legislation in recent weeks: State and Local Government Finance and Policy Committee, Labor and Industry Finance and Policy CommitteeEnvironment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy CommitteeJudiciary Finance and Civil Law Committee and Commerce Finance and Policy Committee.

Here are the Senate committees: Jobs and Economic Development Committee, Commerce and Consumer Protection Committee and Judiciary and Public Safety Committee.

Lawmakers and the governor have expressed optimism about the prospects of legalization this session, especially with Democrats newly in control of both chambers, whereas last session they only had a House majority.

Following their election win in November, Democrats internally agreed to discuss the issue imminently.

House Speaker Melissa Hortman (D) said recently that she expects cannabis reform to be included in the governor’s forthcoming budget request, though she reiterated that the reform “will take a long time” to move through the legislature.

While marijuana reform was excluded from a list of legislative priorities that Democrats unveiled this month, Hortman said that the issue is “a priority,” albeit a “very big, complicated.”

The governor included funding for implementing legalization in his last executive budget request, but lawmakers were unable to enact the policy change. He and Hortman have differing opinions about how quickly the issue can advance this session, however, with Walz recently saying it would be done “by May” and the speaker indicating it could take until next year.

Winkler told Marijuana Moment earlier this month that he agrees with the governor, saying “it is likely that [passing legalization] will be done by May.”

“The reason is that the legislature adjourns until next year at the end of May, and so if they don’t do it in that timeline, it’ll take another full year—and I don’t think anything will be improved or bettered by waiting,” he said. “So it’s in everyone’s interest to get this bill passed.”

Two polls released in September found that the majority of Minnesota residents support adult-use marijuana legalization—and one survey showed that even more Minnesotans approve of the state’s move to legalize THC-infused edibles that was enacted earlier this year.

survey conducted by officials with the House at the annual State Fair that was released in September also found majority support for legalization. That legislature-run poll found that 61 percent of Minnesotans back legalizing cannabis for adult use.

Support was up this year from 58 percent when the House Public Information Services polled fair goers on the issue in 2021. In 2019, the House poll found 56 percent support for legalization.

Oklahoma Could Generate Nearly Half A Billion In Marijuana Tax Dollars Over Five Years If Voters Approve Legalization Next Month, Analysis Shows

Photo courtesy of Mike Latimer.

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Trade agency rules in favor of cannabis vaporizer companies in … – Marijuana Business Daily

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Is delta-8 safe?: 5 things to know about edibles and vapes – Courier Journal

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As the nationwide debate about legalizing marijuana continues to grow, delta-8 THC products, products derived from hemp that can cause a „high” similar to, but apparently milder than marijuana, are becoming increasingly popular and easier to buy across the commonwealth.

Because of minimal state and federal regulations on the manufacture of these products, which can be legally purchased in Kentucky, some are skeptical about the safety of delta-8. Currently, delta-8 products are not FDA-approved.

„Delta-8 THC is one of over 100 cannabinoids produced naturally by the cannabis plant but is not found in significant amounts in the cannabis plant. As a result, concentrated amounts of delta-8 THC are typically manufactured from hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD),” according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.  

As Kentucky debates medical marijuana,McConnell’s hemp push already lets people get high

Delta-8 is legal because the 2018 farm bill, which was supported by Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., federally legalized hemp and a wide range of its derivatives, including CBD and other cannabinoids.

And while delta-8 is a naturally occurring substance, there is a manufacturing element used to produce enough of the cannabinoid to create various products, which include things such as gummies, seltzers and vapes. As a result, these products can contain things such as residual solvents, heavy metals and mycotoxins, all things that can be potentially harmful for people to consume.

„I think one of the things the public may not understand is that the delta-8 … in these products is synthetic,” said Dr. Richard Sams, the scientific director at KCA Labs, a third-party analytical laboratory in Nicholasville. „It’s not isolated from plants; it’s produced by an acid-catalyzed conversion of CBD that’s been isolated from hemp.”

Michael Lemmons, a military veteran who lives in Louisville, has been using delta-8 products for years and said they have helped him to stop relying on prescription medications he felt were negatively impacting his physical and mental health.

„I have no safety concerns regarding delta-8,” said Lemmons, who specified he gets products only from 502 Hemp Wellness Center in Louisville.

But others aren’t as confident in the unregulated but legal delta-8 market. At CBD Pure Hemp Oil in Prospect, store owner Daniel Barhorst takes a more cautious approach. 

„I actually think there should be more regulation of the products of delta-8 that are being distributed out there,” Barhorst said. „I think some of the products … should definitely be FDA approved, so the FDA can actually qualify them.”

With minimal state and federal regulations of delta-8, consumers may have a hard time determining if the product they want to consume is safe or not. Here are five things to know about the health and safety of delta-8 products:

Purchase delta-8 from a hemp dispensary or health-related business

Delta-8 can be sold anywhere from a hemp dispensary to a CBD shop to a gas station. When looking for quality and purity standards, many shop owners say it is vital to purchase products from a reputable business where employees can discuss concerns or answer questions about the products.

„As with all food-based supplements, caution is needed when purchasing delta-8. Most of us would not purchase our vitamins at a gas station, and an easy way to avoid safety issues is to simply purchase from a legitimate hemp dispensary or other health-related business,” said Nancy Roberts, co-founder of One Love Hemp Dispensary, which sells a variety of CBD, delta-8 and delta-9 products.

What to look for on delta-8 package labeling

In November, Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear filed an executive order that partially deals with the labeling and packaging of cannabinoid products. These products must adhere to 902 KAR 45:190, which includes packaging and labeling requirements for hemp-derived products.

Package labeling is required to be in size six font or larger and include: a statement of identity or common product name; the total quantity of units in the package; the ingredients of hemp-derived products; the manufacturer name; the total amount of cannabinoids per serving; suggested use instructions; expiration date; and a statement saying the product is within the federal legal limit of 0.3% delta-9 THC.

Oftentimes, delta-9 THC — the chemical primarily responsible for the mental „high” marijuana causes — is present in delta-8 products.

If you’re planning to consume a CBD or delta-8 product, „look at the labeling, see if it’s compliant,” Barhorst said. „If it doesn’t have a label on it, I wouldn’t [consume] it, would you?”

Ask for lab testing results on delta-8 THC products 

Delta-8 THC products are not required to be tested by a laboratory for toxins, pesticides or other hazardous materials at any stage of production before products end up on shelves. Despite this, many companies such as DazeD8, a company that uses Kentucky hemp, voluntarily submit samples to labs, such as KCA Labs, to have products tested for quality and purity. 

„Companies should have certificates of analysis available to verify the product is indeed what the package states,” One Love’s Roberts told The Courier Journal. 

A certificate of analysis, or COA, is a lab report that shows consumers information such as the date the sample was received and tested, a batch number that can be matched to products in store, total cannabinoids, delta-8 THC percentage, foreign matter and more. 

However, Sams with KCA Labs advises consumers to still be skeptical of those COAs. Testing is not standardized nor regulated, so companies can pick and choose testing that will make their products appear safe to consumers on a those reports. 

„We test only for what the client requests us to test for,” Sams said. „If the client requests the tests for the cannabinoids and wants us to verify the amount of delta-8, for example, and doesn’t request other tests, then we wouldn’t be testing for residual solvents and heavy metals and those kinds of things.”

Ryan Bellone, chief commercial officer of KCA Labs, said there is a greater need for testing regulation to help put higher-purity products on the market. 

„There are some companies that are working toward trying to achieve the highest purity delta-8 with the lowest amount of byproducts or even the lowest amount of delta-9 THC present in the product, while other companies will make a lower purity product and be willing to put that out to market to make a buck,” Bellone said. 

What are some red flags for a delta-8 certificate of analysis?

Many COAs come with QR codes so consumers can verify product contents on their phone. However, Bellone said if the QR codes are missing, that’s a red flag a COA may have been tampered with.

Other red flags include if the company information of the original submitter of the sample is removed, if coloring and font differentiate from other parts of the COA, and if batch number information is missing.

„There are some companies that will go out there and they’ll get one test and it’ll be for a certain batch of material,” Bellone said. „They may even leave the batch number off the submission to us and then they’ll basically extrapolate those results to other batches that actually have not been tested.”

But it’s not all bad. As the lack of testing on delta-8 products continues to be largely unregulated, Sams notes KCA Labs is now seeing higher-purity products coming through the labs. 

„We’re beginning to see more of the better” products, Sams said. “A year ago, we never saw compliant material.” 

Check dosage amounts on delta-8 THC products

All delta-8 products should list the suggested dosage instructions as part of the labeling requirements. When consuming a delta-8 product, it is important to understand how much of the cannabinoid is being consumed and consider how that might impact you.

At One Love Hemp Dispensary, Roberts and her team offer THC serving-size information cards to customers. Roberts said the goal is to help educate people about best practices and how to avoid overconsumption. 

„The No. 1 danger of delta-8 is uneducated and inexperienced consumers who do not respect responsible consumption,” Roberts said.  

Barhorst said it’s important to discuss dosage when talking to customers.

„We always tell people to go under the suggested dosing,” Barhorst said. „For instance, when we have a gummy, that is 25 milligrams, we suggest just taking half. I always tell people to go under the dosing to see how your body reacts to it.”

Contact reporter Olivia Evans at oevans@courier-journal.com or on Twitter at @oliviamevans_