Cannabis Confusion Over Hemp, Marijuana Creates Issues With Law Enforcement – CBS Denver

EAGLE COUNTY, Colo. (CBS4)– A Greeley woman is breathing much easier after drug charges against her were dropped. It’s an example of what’s becoming a more common case of confusion in Colorado involving two types of cannabis plants.

(credit: CBS)

It was in May when a truck driving down Interstate 70 in Eagle County was stopped for a traffic violation. Megan Meyer was driving that truck and arrested on charges of transporting more than 100 pounds of pot.

(credit: CBS)

She had been hired just a few days earlier by a CBD company to drive hemp from Colorado to Las Vegas.

(credit: CBS)

“I’m being told $1 million fine, 30 years in prison, sitting there in your handcuffs thinking, ‘Oh my God,’” Meyer told CBS4’s Rick Sallinger.

The boxes in the truck were taken as evidence, along with a container of oil.

(credit: Eagle County)

Meyer said, “Industrial hemp flowers like the product I was carrying looks a lot and smells like marijuana. The only way you can tell the difference is with analysis of the THC content.”

Hemp and marijuana are both cannabis plants but hemp contains a much lower level of the psychoactive ingredient THC.

(credit: Eagle County)

Hemp is now used to make CBD products. It was legalized under the 2018 Farm Bill.

Eagle district Attorney Bruce Brown says the charges are being dropped against Meyer after the evidence was tested.

(credit: CBS)

“We did test some material of the plant that was seized from the vehicle she was driving and we determined that it appears to be hemp, not marijuana.”

(credit: CBS)

He says since there is no roadside test, one alternative could be to give out a summons instead of taking the person into custody until the product being seized can be tested.

“Law enforcement officials are not in a good position when they make a stop of a car and detect the presence of plant material consistent with marijuana,” Brown added.

(credit: CDOT)

The 160 pounds of hemp seized will be now returned to the owner in a case of cannabis confusion, that is more than likely to happen again.

The Cannabis Catch-Up: You’ve Been Warned – Seven Days

click to enlarge The DMV message - SASHA GOLDSTEIN

  • Sasha Goldstein
  • The DMV message

If you’re a Vermonter who’s had to renew a vehicle registration in the last few weeks, you’ve likely received a warning in the mail from the state Department of Motor Vehicles.

“Drug-impaired driving is a problem on America’s highways,” the message reads. “Like drunk driving, drugged driving is impaired driving, which means it is dangerous and illegal in every state.”

The note goes on to explain that though weed is legal in Vermont, “marijuana may impair your ability to drive safely. If you’re impaired, even to the slightest degree, take your key and Pass It On,” it reads.

So what’s the story behind the warning? According to Keith Flynn, who works in the state highway safety office, the Agency of Transportation cycles in new messages every few months. Sometimes it’s about speed, other times it’s about motorcycle safety.

“It’s just an awareness piece,” Flynn said. “It’s just a platform to put a message on.”

The safety messages could be getting through. As of August 19, 17 people had died this year on Vermont roadways, according to state data. An 18th person died in a Friday morning crash on Interstate 89 near Richmond; also Friday morning, a construction worker was hit and critically injured by a car on Route 7 near New Haven.

As of this time last year, 39 people had died on Vermont roadways. The numbers were similar the prior two years.

“It’s a good year,” Flynn said Thursday of the relatively low 2019 tally. “If you’re in the highway safety business, these are obviously good numbers. Still, it’s 17 people that died. It’s not one of those things where you can plant a flag and start doing a dance around the flag, because there are still 17 families that lost family members. But it shows that, at least for this year, the needle’s pointing in the right direction, reducing the number of families that have to go through all that.”

The data as of August 19 show that of 17 people killed in crashes this year, two drivers had “active cannabis — delta 9 THC” in their systems. During all of last year, 16 of 68 drivers killed had cannabis in their systems.

According to the state medical examiner’s office, a forensic toxicology lab samples blood taken from a driver in a fatal crash. Any amount detected is listed in the data.

With ‚Mixed Emotions,’ Scott Legalizes Marijuana in Vermont
Gov. Phil Scott

With ‚Mixed Emotions,’ Scott Legalizes Marijuana in Vermont

By Taylor Dobbs

Off Message

Gov. Phil Scott has long said he won’t sign a bill allowing the legal sale of cannabis until there’s a roadside testing protocol for drug-impaired drivers in place. Flynn, who spent six years as Vermont’s Department of Public Safety commissioner during the administration of then-governor Peter Shumlin, said it’s too soon to tell if legal weed is wreaking havoc on the state’s roadways.

“We just don’t have enough of a track record yet to draw any conclusions,” Flynn said. “We’re new to it … It’s a time thing. We have 100-plus years of research on alcohol — and we don’t have that on cannabis.”

Here are some other cannabis stories we read this week:


August 7: The U.S. Navy has prohibited sailors and marines from using any hemp-derived products, including those containing widely available cannabidiol. Testing positive for THC could lead to an „other than honorable” discharge from the military. [U.S. Navy]


August 19: „Federally insured credit unions may provide certain financial services to legally operating hemp businesses under new guidance published today by the National Credit Union Administration.” [National Credit Union Administration]


August 21: Utah, which is working to implement a medical marijuana program, has abandoned plans for a state-run network of cannabis dispensaries. Instead, lawmakers will allow private businesses to operate 12 dispensaries across the state. [Ben Winslow, KSTU-TV]


August 22: The owners of Ridin’ High Skate Shop, John Van Hazinga and Samantha Steady, face federal conspiracy charges for growing marijuana and selling it out of their eccentric Burlington storefront. [Derek Brouwer, Seven Days]


August 22: Hemp — it’s not just for making fun of people who mistake it for weed and smoke it anymore. Turns out, smoking hemp is a fad driven by the surge in popularity of CBD. [Emily Corwin, Vermont Public Radio]


August 22: „A sudden spike in the number of registered patients and the addition of more dispensaries serving them may be causing a ‚drought’ of medical marijuana available in the Philadelphia region.” [Sam Wood, the Philadelphia Inquirer]


August 22: Large areas of Ontario, the most populous Canadian province , will continue to be without recreational cannabis stores after the latest lottery for 42 licenses left out chunks of southwestern and eastern Ontario. [Matt Lundy, the Globe and Mail]


August 22: Bia Diagnostics, a food testing lab in Colchester, has expanded to include hemp and cannabis testing. [WCAX-TV]

Researchers Unlock What Gives Cannabis Its Anti-Inflammatory Qualities – Yahoo Finance

WeedMaps News‚ Mark Taylor, provided exclusively to Benzinga Cannabis.” data-reactid=”18″>By WeedMaps News‚ Mark Taylor, provided exclusively to Benzinga Cannabis.

A new study deciphers for the first time the cannabis plant’s biological blueprint for producing two molecules thought to have anti-inflammatory properties, a discovery that could pave the way for expanded use of cannabis as medicine.

study, which is published in the August 2019 issue of the journal Phytochemistry delineates for the first time the biosynthesis pathway outside of the actual cannabis sativa plant that allows reproduction of the molecules cannflavin A and cannflavin B.” data-reactid=”20″>That study, which is published in the August 2019 issue of the journal Phytochemistry delineates for the first time the biosynthesis pathway outside of the actual cannabis sativa plant that allows reproduction of the molecules cannflavin A and cannflavin B.

Those cannflavins belong to the class of plant flavonoids, plant chemicals found in almost all fruits and vegetables, known as flavones, which occur in several plant lineages.

The study shows the medicinal versatility of the cannabis plant: Beyond the intoxicating ingredient THC and therapeutic oils that often contain cannabidiol (CBD), there exist many other specialized metabolites requiring further research. 

The researchers at Guelph University in Ontario, Canada, unlocked the blueprint for producing the cannflavins, which were discovered in a 1985 study and were found to display “potent anti-inflammatory activity in various animal cell models.”

The new information in the Phytochemistry study opens a pathway to figure how to engineer plant metabolism to make medicine from the cannflavin A and B enzymes. 

Tariq Ahktar, lead author and assistant professor of plant biochemistry at Guelph’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, told Weedmaps News that “for almost 30 years nobody touched these molecules or worked extensively on them. We thought it was a good time to look at these very promising molecules more closely.”

Ahktar said his laboratory utilizes plant chemistry and genomics to determine how plants produce certain molecules and compounds that have medicinal or industrial uses.

He said the cannaflavins A and B were discovered in the United Kingdom more than 30 years ago by researcher Marilyn Barrett. Her study also introduced the name cannflavin. Barrett’s research also showed that cannflavins A and B have nearly 30 times the power of aspirin to inhibit inflammation in cells.

Yet that discovery is just the beginning. Ahktar explained that the two cannflavins are present in cannabis in very low amounts.

“So if you want to gain the anti-inflammatory benefits, you would have to consume copious amounts of cannabis, which is both unlikely and impractical,” he said, necessitating the need to reproduce the molecules outside of the cannabis plant.

He said cannflavins are “definitely encouraging news” for people suffering from acute and chronic pain, who have few effective alternatives to opioids, which work by blocking the brain’s pain receptors. These cannflavins appear to take a different path by attacking cells that encourage inflammation, a primary cause of much pain.

Ahktar said that for decades American and Canadian researchers have been unable to research the medicinal properties of cannabis because of prohibitions against the cultivation and sale of the plant, still considered illegal by the U.S. federal government. Ahktar said his team has demonstrated a biochemical pathway for commercial producers to allow the production of cannflavins A and B from yeast, bacteria, plants, or other means.

“That way you don’t have to grow huge fields of cannabis to obtain the benefits,” he said, noting that the Guelph researchers have patented the genes and licensed their research to Toronto-based Anahit International Corp., to biosynthesize those molecules.

The ability to “hack” other plants or microorganisms to produce their medicinal compounds offers great potential benefits to science and industry. Dr. Jeff Chen, Director of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Cannabis Research Initiative, spoke at the July 2019 Microscopes and Machines conference in Los Angeles about using biosynthesis as an alternative that is more scalable, consistent and continuous than plant farming to produce cannabinoids and other beneficial compounds. 

Chen cautioned that science has a long way to go to find the most efficient method of producing the cannabinoids and other beneficial compounds. Patients, however, haven’t been waiting.

Ahktar said he spoke with many patients who used cannabis successfully to treat a range of conditions and swore it improved their pain levels and reduced inflammation.

“That got me thinking that there is something else besides CBD contributing to these benefits and it didn’t take me long to find Barrett’s research,” he said. “My primary focus is to help people with pain.”

Ahktar cautioned that “we are a long way from being able to offer cannflavin products on store shelves. This is not my business or interest. I don’t know if this would be marketed as a natural product or undergo clinical trials for drug testing.”

As researchers focus on how cannabis can be used to relieve pain, they’re also gaining new insights about the process of inflammation. (Gina Coleman/Weedmaps News)

He said today neither researchers nor consumers can purchase pure cannflavins A and B.

“Now that we have a mechanism for reproducing this, we can start producing it and performing side by side comparisons with existing pain relievers and test their relative efficacy.”

214 million prescriptions for opioid pain in 2016, with an estimated 11 million people misusing prescription opioids that year. More than two-thirds of the 63,632 drug overdose deaths in 2016 involved prescription or illicit opioids. From 1999 to 2017, almost 218,000 people died in the United States from overdoses related to prescription opioids.” data-reactid=”52″>The study comes amid an ongoing opioid crisis in the United States. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. healthcare providers prescribed more than 214 million prescriptions for opioid pain in 2016, with an estimated 11 million people misusing prescription opioids that year. More than two-thirds of the 63,632 drug overdose deaths in 2016 involved prescription or illicit opioids. From 1999 to 2017, almost 218,000 people died in the United States from overdoses related to prescription opioids.

Gregory Gerdeman, chief scientific officer for the St. Petersburg, Florida-based medicinal cannabis cultivator 3 Boys Farm and a neuroscientist who has studied the effects of cannabis on the brain for 22 years, said the takeaway from the study is that herbal cannabis takes a multifaceted approach to combating inflammation and that it may offer a greater therapeutic value than the THC or CBD alone.

“It also may point to potential drug development,” Gerdeman said. “I believe in herbal cannabis as a medicine. I think it already offers a very promising strategy for replacing opioids. We now know how the plant synthesizes cannflavins A and B and we’re living in an age in which pharmaceutical companies are creating genetically modified cannabis that could allow drug factories to reproduce these molecules outside of the cannabis plant. This study shows how the science of cannabis as a medicine is being taken seriously today in the medical and pharmaceutical worlds. It was not that way in 1997 or even in 2007.”

This study shows how the science of cannabis as a medicine is being taken seriously today in the medical and pharmaceutical worlds. It was not that way in 1997 or even in 2007.

He called cannabis the “queen of medicinal plants,” adding, “We have many secrets yet to learn from her.”

Gerdeman cautioned, however, that the Canadian study did not explore the precise role of cannflavins A and B in fighting inflammation or the molecules’ potential therapeutic effects.

“The assertion from a 30-year-old study that these cannflavins offer anti-inflammatory effects 30 times the strength of aspirin requires much more research and study to validate. It would be premature to say that using isolated cannflavins as a drug would be desirable or without safety concerns.”

‚THC Used To Be The Hero, Now It’s CBD’: A Chat With Hollywood Actor Turned Cannabis Entrepreneur Derek DuChesne – Benzinga

Read more about our latest Cannabis News! CANNABIS HOME

Earlier this year, EcoGen Labs named actor Derek DuChesne as its chief growth officer. 

The company is a vertically integrated manufacturer and supplier of hemp-derived products for the cannabis industry.

The company develops its own proprietary machinery, genetics and extraction processes.

DuChesne shared a set with Hollywood names such as Michael C. Hall, Julia Stiles, Raymond Cruz, Bruce Willis and Robert DeNiro before turning to the cannabis industry. 

First Steps Into The Industry

DuChesne told Benzinga that he was a user of CBD products before he became involved with EcoGen Labs, and first became interested in the cannabis industry after his mother found relief for fibromyalgia-related pain with CBD. 

“Her fibromyalgia is extremely severe, to the point where she’ll blackout and collapse because her nervous system shuts down from too much pain,” DuChesne said.

„I took off from auditioning for a year and moved home to take care of her. I flew all over the country meeting with doctors, and I believe that outside of her sickness, the pharmaceutical medications that she was on were debilitating her.”

Those pills included opiates, barbiturates, antidepressants and benzodiazepines, he said. 

„She was in a walker, then a wheelchair for years and got to a point for a while where she couldn’t live a normal life.” 

The actor said he first heard of CBD from an urgent care doctor who recommended CBD suppositories to bypass the liver and get more of the active ingredient into his mother’s bloodstream. 

“Within six months, along with diet, physical therapy and weaning off her meds, she was walking again. It was phenomenal and she got off of over 80% of her medications,” DuChesne said. 

After those events DuChesne decided to jump straight into the cannabis industry, with a focus on the medical properties of CBD.

“I started a CBD marketing company called Healing Ventures to help launch brands in the space. This quickly turned into a supply chain and marketing company, since it was extremely difficult to get a reliable supply and manufacturing of CBD — which is what led me to EcoGen.”

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The Importance Of Vertical Integration 

While working on his incubator for cannabis brands, DuChesne said he ran into some trouble in 2018, when hemp biomass became scarce in the U.S. market. 

„The market became flooded with foreign product that was contaminated with heavy metals, synthetic products that aren’t stable and pesticide issues.”

It was a „nightmare” sourcing the raw materials needed for cannabis brands, he said. 

„Finally, after a year-and-a-half, I met EcoGen. In a lot of industries it doesn’t make sense to be vertically integrated. But when you’re manufacturing hemp-derived products, you have to be.”

Due to its vertical integration, DuChesne said EcoGen was able to solve every issue he encountered with cannabis partners.

„It was the company I was searching for that I never knew existed,” said the former actor, who eventually met the company’s co-founder and president Joseph Nunez and was invited to join as chief growth officer. 

“Our genetics and technologies are improving daily, and we’re very excited about what the future holds. THC used to be the hero for the last 100 years, now it’s CBD. The future is CBG, CBN, CBC, CBL [and others], and we’re bringing those to market in their purest forms.”

Click here for more information about the upcoming Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference Oct. 22-23 in Chicago.

Picture courtesy of CMW Media.

Read more about our latest Cannabis News! CANNABIS HOME

© 2019 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Financial Services for US Cannabis Firms Gaining Traction – Market Realist

At CannaGather, a cannabis industry event held in New York City this week, New York Representative Carolyn Maloney expressed her optimism about the Secure And Fair Enforcement (or SAFE) Banking Act being approved in the House. Notably, the SAFE Banking Act aims to provide banking access to the rapidly growing cannabis industry.

According to an August 22 Forbes report, Maloney said at CannaGather, “It’s really one of the most interesting pieces of legislation to watch.” She added, “I believe it will pass in the House this year.”

In another favorable development for the cannabis sector this week, credit unions are now permitted to offer banking services to hemp businesses.

Credit unions can bank with hemp companies

On August 19, the National Credit Union Administration (or NCUA) announced that federally insured credit unions might offer certain financial services to legal hemp businesses. This move comes as the 2018 Farm Bill federally legalized the hemp crop and its derivatives.

The NCUA’s interim guidance stated, “Some credit unions have lawfully operating hemp businesses within their fields of membership. Businesses dealing with hemp and hemp-derived products include manufacturing, distribution, shipping, and retail, among others. With recent changes in federal law, more hemp-related businesses may be founded, and existing ones may expand.”

SAFE Banking Act to support cannabis companies

The cannabis industry—including major players such as Canopy Growth (WEED) (CGC), Aurora Cannabis (ACB), and Aphria (APHA)—is estimated to grow into a multibillion-dollar industry. According to a May 2019 report by Grand View Research, the global legal marijuana market is expected to touch $66.3 billion by the end of 2025.

There is plenty of room for these companies to expand further as more states contemplate legalizing medical and recreational marijuana. Currently, 33 US states and Washington, DC, have legalized medical marijuana. Also, the recreational cannabis market exists in 10 states and the District of Columbia.

The SAFE Banking Act aims to prevent federal regulators from penalizing banks for providing financial services to cannabis companies, as cannabis is still not legalized at the federal level. On July 23, the Senate held a hearing on the SAFE Banking Act. Notably, the SAFE Banking Act has 31 cosponsors in the Senate and 206 cosponsors in the House of Representatives.

Access to banking services would benefit cannabis companies. This access would facilitate their expansion plans, including increasing production capacity, supply chain expansion, and international growth. The banking system would see a massive cash infusion from the cannabis industry. Plus, this bill could help reduce instances of money laundering in the sector.

Recent expansion moves

Major cannabis companies are investing heavily in their strategic expansion plans, including organic growth and strategic acquisitions. Aphria has been investing in the expansion of its production capacity. Notably, it is awaiting Health Canada’s approval for its Aphria Diamond facility. To learn more about Aphria’s expansion plans, please read Aphria’s Strategic Growth Initiatives Drive APHA Stock.

Canopy Growth recently announced that it received an extraction license from Health Canada for its KeyLeaf Life Sciences facility. This license is expected to increase the company’s production capacity.

On August 19, Aurora Cannabis announced its acquisition of Hempco Food and Fiber. This acquisition would help Aurora expand its presence in the hemp market.

If the SAFE Banking Act is passed, then banks would be able to support the expansion plans of cannabis companies and help them address the growing global demand.

On August 22, stock prices of Aurora Cannabis and Aphria were up 13.7% and 10.2%, respectively, year-to-date. On the other hand, Canopy Growth stock was down 8.5% YTD on the day.

First Death in a Spate of Vaping Sicknesses Reported by Health Officials – The New York Times

A patient in Illinois is the first to die of a mysterious lung illness linked to vaping, public health officials announced on Friday.

The death occurred as doctors and hospitals nationwide report an increasing number of vaping-related respiratory illnesses this summer: 193 cases have now been reported in 22 states, including 22 cases in Illinois, officials said.

They have been stumped in recent weeks by the cause. State investigators have not found a common link — other than vaping in general — among the patients turning up in emergency rooms.

Many patients, including some in Illinois, have acknowledged vaping of tetrahydrocannabinol, or (T.H.C.), the high-inducing chemical in marijuana, according to statements from federal and state health agencies.

But officials don’t know whether the ailments have been caused by marijuana-type products, e-cigarettes, or some type of street concoction that was vaped, or whether a contaminant or defective device may have been involved.

The Illinois patient’s death was disclosed during a news conference held by officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and the state of Illinois.

They did not provide details about the patient’s identity, saying only that the person was an adult who had vaped recently and then succumbed to a severe respiratory illness.

Health officials did not say what product the patient had used, whether an e-cigarette or other vaping device; nor did they specify what substance was vaped.

Amid the lack of information, investigators are scrambling to find shared links to the respiratory problems. Officials said earlier this week that many patients, most of whom were adolescents or young adults, had described difficulty breathing, chest pain, vomiting and fatigue.

The most seriously ill patients have had extensive lung damage that required treatment with oxygen and days on a ventilator. Some are expected to have permanent lung damage.

“More information is needed to know what is causing these illnesses,” said Ileana Arias, an official with the C.D.C., said on Friday.

The Illinois patients have ranged in age from 17 to 38, according to the state health department.

State health departments are handling most investigations into the respiratory illnesses.

“We’re at a relatively early stage of understanding,” Mitchell Zeller, director for the Center for Tobacco Products at the F.D.A., said on Friday. The collective agencies were throwing “a lot of resources at this,” he added, but part of the problem was that state investigations are not always complete, making it difficult to form a clear picture.

One theory, as of yet unproved, is that illnesses may result from substances that are thought or known to be toxic in vaping products, which use heat to vaporize nicotine and other inhalants.

Brian King, deputy director of research translation at the Office on Smoking and Health at the C.D.C., said that potential irritants include “ultrafine particulates, some heavy metals, such as lead,” and, he said, there “are also concerns about some flavorings.”

But, he added, “We haven’t specifically linked any of those ingredients to specific cases.”

Dr. Michael Lynch, medical director of the Pittsburgh Poison Center at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, said the lung injuries doctors there are seeing are consistent with chemical inhalation injuries.

Dr. John Holcomb, a pulmonologist in San Antonio, Tex., noted that the F.D.A. has no control over the ingredients used in vaping products.

“The problem is we don’t know what’s being inhaled through these devices, of which there are five or six hundred different kinds,” he said. “We have to assume that some of them may be dangerous and some may not be dangerous.”

Others suggested that individuals are emptying out commercial nicotine pods and filling them up with a combination of T.H.C. oil and other chemicals.

If the respiratory illnesses can be traced to T.H.C.-laced vapors, public health officials and doctors expressed concern that it may signal the emergence of a second front in the battle against youth vaping: the growing use of unregulated, bootleg or black market cannabis liquids.

“We believe that they are getting empty cartridges from somewhere and filling them with their own products,” said Nancy Gerking, assistant director of public health in Kings County, Calif., which has had numerous cases. “We don’t know what they are cutting it with or anything else.”

Until recently, these cases have been off the radar of most doctors and public health officials, who were already struggling to stop youths from vaping standard e-cigarettes. But cannabis liquids and oils have become more widely available online and in many stores. And because the ingredients may not be disclosed at all, unsuspecting consumers may be exposed to a cocktail of hazardous chemicals.

The e-cigarette market has broadened to counterfeiters and a range of devices that can be packed with different substances, including marijuana, but also various flavors and concoctions that may be mixed inexpertly.

Public health officials, however, declined to say if they yet are seeing a pattern that would make clear whether the problematic products are made by mass-market companies or counterfeiters, or whether the inhalants involved are standard to many vaping products or made or mixed by consumers themselves.

The recent revelations could also further complicate the tarnished image of the growing e-cigarette market. For several years, the industry and top-selling companies, like Juul, have faced scrutiny because of the rising popularity of e-cigarettes among teenagers, which threatens to create a new generation of nicotine addicts who may become eventual cigarette smokers.

California Says Its Cannabis Revenue Has Fallen Short Of Estimates, Despite Gains – NPR

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I Used CBD Oil During Period Sex and This is What Happened – Yahoo Lifestyle

Click here to read the full article.” data-reactid=”16″>Click here to read the full article.

CBD arousal oil was far from what I anticipated. Then again, it was my first time using CBD anything, so I guess I didn’t exactly know what to expect. Like just about all CBD products on the market, the brand I used, coupled with customer reviews, boasted about its supposed effects. Among them were heightened orgasms, lessened pain, a “decrease in muscular tension,” and “enhanced blood flow.” But what I really was interested in — as I’m sure were most clients — was the chance that I might experience mind-blowing orgasms, because who doesn’t want that?” data-reactid=”17″>My first time having sex using CBD arousal oil was far from what I anticipated. Then again, it was my first time using CBD anything, so I guess I didn’t exactly know what to expect. Like just about all CBD products on the market, the brand I used, coupled with customer reviews, boasted about its supposed effects. Among them were heightened orgasms, lessened pain, a “decrease in muscular tension,” and “enhanced blood flow.” But what I really was interested in — as I’m sure were most clients — was the chance that I might experience mind-blowing orgasms, because who doesn’t want that?

period.” data-reactid=”18″>I’ll admit, I was skeptical. Most products I’ve tried — to enhance sex or other — rarely offered claimed or desired results. So, why would this particular product be any different? It was. I orgasmed almost immediately. Desired goal achieved? I’d say so. But then, something else happened. My period.

improve blood flow, encourage a change in uterine contractions, and produce endorphin release: the opposite of which all are believed to occur during menstruation. Orgasm or not, period sex isn’t always the most comfortable.” data-reactid=”24″>Most times I’ve had period sex were to help reduce cramps, a recommendation from an article I read a few years back. According to Margaret E. Long, M.D., a gynecologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, orgasms are suspected to improve blood flow, encourage a change in uterine contractions, and produce endorphin release: the opposite of which all are believed to occur during menstruation. Orgasm or not, period sex isn’t always the most comfortable.

This instance was different. I can’t say I remember experiencing cramps beforehand, but discomfort during intercourse, as well as throughout the following day, wasn’t apparent. In fact, it was nonexistent — a rarity for me. Could I credit my symptom-free period to this mystical cannabinoid I’ve read so much about?

CBD specialist in Bethesda, Maryland. Reason being? Research regarding topical CBD and CBD in general is limited. Although there are studies that report a decrease in participants’ pain when using cannabinoid topicals, CBD has yet to be evaluated by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA); therefore, guidelines have not yet been established to determine what CBD effectively treats, its proper dosage, its interaction with other drugs and foods, and whether it could potentially cause dangerous side effects or safety concerns.” data-reactid=”26″>“I can’t tell you that it doesn’t do anything, but I also can’t tell you it works really well,” says Matthew Mintz, M.D., F.A.C.P, a board-certified internal medicine physician and CBD specialist in Bethesda, Maryland. Reason being? Research regarding topical CBD and CBD in general is limited. Although there are studies that report a decrease in participants’ pain when using cannabinoid topicals, CBD has yet to be evaluated by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA); therefore, guidelines have not yet been established to determine what CBD effectively treats, its proper dosage, its interaction with other drugs and foods, and whether it could potentially cause dangerous side effects or safety concerns.

period sex more enjoyable? Not exactly. While Mintz doesn’t regard CBD topicals as harmful, he does recommend a few guidelines to consider when making a purchase, to ensure you’re receiving a safe and high-performing product. “You want to know that you’re getting a high-quality product that actually has CBD in it,” he says. “The only way you can know that is if the product is verified by an independent third party — that is, it’s sent to a lab to confirm it contains CBD.”” data-reactid=”34″>Does this mean I should never again use CBD arousal oil to help make period sex more enjoyable? Not exactly. While Mintz doesn’t regard CBD topicals as harmful, he does recommend a few guidelines to consider when making a purchase, to ensure you’re receiving a safe and high-performing product. “You want to know that you’re getting a high-quality product that actually has CBD in it,” he says. “The only way you can know that is if the product is verified by an independent third party — that is, it’s sent to a lab to confirm it contains CBD.”

To know whether or not your product is third-party verified, review the brand’s website or packaging for wording that suggests it, such as “independently lab tested for purity,” or for a “purity tested” label. It’s also important to ensure the brand states its products are free of pesticides, additives, and other chemicals that are or could be potentially toxic, and that your product is full- or broad-spectrum (THC-free and CBD-rich), as higher concentrations equal lower dosages.

monthly visit. Here’s a few high-performing brands to help you get started:” data-reactid=”38″>That said, it’s about damn time you enjoyed yourself during your monthly visit. Here’s a few high-performing brands to help you get started:

Foria Awaken, $48 Foriawellness.com” data-reactid=”39″>Foria Awaken, $48 Foriawellness.com

In just a few spritzes on your ladybits and less than five minutes, this CBD prelube delivers relaxed and warm sensations, a perfect way to amp up foreplay. After 15 to 30 minutes, expect this arousal oil to work its full magic with reduced discomfort and enhanced sensitivity as possible results. Just be sure to first test its powers on an area other than your vag to evade intimate contact with possible allergens. Also be sure to avoid use with latex condoms, as they’re non-compatible.

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How to Qualify for Medical Cannabis in Louisiana – Leafly

Louisiana has had therapeutic or medical cannabis legislation on the books for a long time. Decades, actually. But before the past few years, it hasn’t mattered because there were no protections in place that made it worth the risk for doctors to recommend and patients to seek. More importantly, it wasn’t until August 1, 2019, that the first round of state-approved medical cannabis was ready to be released.

Presumably you’re here because you want or need a medical cannabis card in Louisiana and you’re wondering: How do I do it? Is it easy? What do I need to know going into this process? Do I even qualify? Those questions will be answered below in this step-by-step guide.

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Do I Qualify for Medical Cannabis in Louisiana?

Louisiana’s list of qualifying conditions includes:

There are some notable omissions of qualifying conditions common in other states, such as arthritis, severe nausea, Alzheimer’s, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), among others, but the list does expand treatment options for a significant pool of patients.

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Be Evaluated by a Certified Physician

As with all medical cannabis programs, documentation is key. And it’s not enough merely to be diagnosed with a qualifying condition. You also have to get a recommendation (not a prescription) from a physician before you can access medical marijuana.

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Doctors must be certified by the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners to recommend medical marijuana to patients. It may take a little digging to find a doctor near you that has the required “therapeutic marijuana registration permit,” but the state does have a database that allows you to search for physicians who have an active permit. Expect more doctors to become certified as the program matures.

Because of ongoing stigma around cannabis, many patients choose to go to a specific medical marijuana clinic rather than visit their primary care physician. These clinics exist in many parts of the state specialize in cannabis treatment and providing recommendations to those who need it. The benefit of visiting a clinic that specializes in medical marijuana is that you don’t have to deal with the anxiety of possibly wasting your time or having an awkward conversation with a reluctant doctor.

A word of advice: Despite the judgment that can come with ongoing stigma around cannabis, don’t leave your regular doctor out of the loop on this. If you’re being treated by one doctor for a serious qualifying condition and decide to seek medical marijuana as a treatment, it’s best if the doctor(s) who treat you regularly are fully aware and on board with it.

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If you do go to a separate clinic for your evaluation, be sure to get your existing medical records beforehand. You don’t have to tell your primary doctor why you want your records—you have a right to them under the law. You can just say you need them for personal reasons, if you prefer.

When you head to your appointment, bring your relevant medical records, a government-issued ID, and some kind of documentation establishing your residency in Louisiana.

Be prepared to pay a couple hundred bucks for that initial visit to a medical marijuana clinic. For reference, The Healing Clinic in Shreveport-Bossier City charges $199 for the first visit, and Total Health Clinic, which has locations in Shreveport, Lafayette, and Lake Charles, costs $249 for the initial evaluation.

If the physician judges that medical marijuana is a good fit for your condition, the clinic will then send your recommendation to a dispensary of your choice.

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I Got My Recommendation. Now What?

You have a qualifying condition. You got evaluated, and the doctor recommended you medical cannabis to treat your condition. Now where do you go to get it?

It’s important to note that Louisiana doesn’t issue medical marijuana “cards” as many other states do. When you receive your recommendation, the recommending physician adds your name to a statewide medical cannabis patient registry.

You’ll also receive a recommendation to take to a state-licensed medical cannabis pharmacy to get the medicine.

Find Medical Marijuana Near You

As of this article’s publication, there are nine licensed pharmacies in Louisiana, one for each designated region of the state. Depending on where you’re located, you may have a bit of a drive ahead of you.

Here are the nine locations:

Note that in Louisiana, unlike most other states, medical cannabis is distributed through “pharmacies”—not “dispensaries.” One thing that distinguishes pharmacies in Louisiana from dispensaries is that they must operate similar to other pharmacies.

“It’s the only place I’ve been to that dispensary technicians are required in order to dispense this product,” iComply CEO Mark Slaugh told WAFB-TV. “If you go to Colorado, they’ll see we’ve got 22, 23-year-old budtenders who don’t have any sort of professional licensing or degree besides their occupational badge that allows them to work in the industry.”

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This higher regulatory burden has the downside of resulting in fewer dispensaries in the state, but the upside is that dispensaries and staff members will ostensibly demonstrate a higher level of knowledge, compliance, and service to patients.

What Kind of Cannabis Can I Get?

Some less-than-ideal news about Louisiana’s medical cannabis program: The product options are still notably limited right now.

Which means, first of all, no smokable or vaping products.

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Eventually, you’ll be able to get medical cannabis in the form of oils, extracts, tinctures, sprays, capsules, pills, solutions, suspension, gelatin-based chewables, lotions and other topicals, transdermal patches, and suppositories.

But for now, it’s pretty straightforward: The first available product is a mint-flavored tincture, according to the Associated Press.

There are two approved growers in Louisiana. Louisiana State University-GB Sciences of Louisiana, and Southern University-Advanced Biomedicals, more commonly referred to as Ilera Holistic Healthcare

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LSU-GBSL just got its first round of medical marijuana approved by the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, the state agency that regulates licensing and production of medical marijuana. Ilera’s product is believed to be set for a fall release.

Final Thoughts

Louisiana’s medical marijuana program is just getting off the ground and is still somewhat limited, but it is functional for many patients, and the process is relatively straightforward.

Kathryn Thomas, the clinical director and managing partner of The Healing Clinic in Shreveport, said even in the early stages of the program and with limited available products, she’s heard numerous success stories from patients already.

“After we’ve waited all this time—and a lot of us have been sitting with offices for about a year, because of course the release date kept getting pushed forward—after all that anticipation, you stop and think: What’s the outcome?” Thomas said. “And what we’re hearing from patients are just marvelous stories. They’re able to take less opiates, or they’re able to sleep. Their pain is diminished. Right now we’re hearing very good reports on the response to the product.”